News & Announcements Archive

Political Science Professors to Be Featured on CSPAN2’s ‘Book TV’

Nine Johns Hopkins University faculty authors will be featured on C-SPAN2’s Book TV over the next several weekends, beginning with Lester Spence, an expert on race and politics, who will discuss his 2011 book Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics on Sunday at 1 p.m. EST and 10 p.m. PST. Benjamin Ginsberg will discuss his book The Worth of War on Jan. 18 at 1:30 p.m. EST.


Political Science Major Named Fulbright Scholar

Bayly Winder, a senior majoring in political science, received a Fulbright grant to Kuwait to study the diwaniyya, intellectual forums. Through visits to a variety of diwaniyyas and interviews with mostly college-aged Kuwaitis, he will research the ways in which this central sociocultural institution is evolving in light of social media and globalization. Winder, who […]


Food and the City

Professor Adam Sheingate’s Baltimore Food System Research class is featured in Arts & Sciences Magazine. The summer course began as an outgrowth of Sheingate’s tremendously popular Food Politics class (70–75 students are often on the waiting list for one of 15 coveted seats). Click to read the article.


Joel Grossman Named Academy Professor

Three faculty members from the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences have been named professors of The Academy at Johns Hopkins, including political science Professor Joel Grossman. The Academy at Johns Hopkins is an institute for advanced study, where retired professors can pursue research opportunities, conduct and attend academic seminars, and explore other opportunities for continued scholarship. Click to read more.


Coming to Grips With ‘Kludgeocracy’

Steven Teles

In an interview with Ezra Klein of the Washington Post, Prof. Steven Teles argues that issues concerning the complexity of government, rather than its size, will dominate American politics going forward. The nation has become a “kludgeocracy,” he says, with too many government programs and policies—”kludges”—that are substantially more complicated than the problems they are trying so solve dictate. Click to read the article.