Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (06)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (01)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (02)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (01)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (03)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 7:30PM - 8:20PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to present
AS.100.442 (01)

This course examines shifting understandings of the philosophical foundations, political implications, and social effects of the market economy since the early twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (03)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (04)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (05)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (02)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (04)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 8:30PM - 9:20PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (02)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (03)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (04)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

Race, Politics and Literature
AS.190.307 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Freshman Seminar: Choosing a President
AS.190.137 (01)

This fall, as they have done every four years for more than 230 years, Americans will elect a president. Presidential elections are one of the more peculiar rituals in American politics, but they are enormously consequential. In this course we will track the 2020 presidential campaign in real time while exploring the history and politics of presidential elections and considering how presidential elections affect other aspects of American politics. The course will involve a combination of reading and writing with hands-on research and exploration projects.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (06)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (05)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Politics of the Korean Diaspora
AS.190.337 (01)

This seminar explores some of the core questions in the study of citizenship, migration, and racial and ethnic politics through the lens of Korean diasporic populations in the United States, Japan, China, and the former Soviet Union. We will examine how immigration, citizenship, and minority policies have structured and constrained the relationship of Korean communities to both the receiving and sending states. As a diasporic group, is there a collective self-identification among members of Korean communities that transcends territorial, hemispheric, linguistic, and cultural differences? Or is the Korean ethnic identity more a reflection of racial and ethnic politics in the receiving society? What factors determine the assimilability of a particular group at a given historical moment?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Social Policy Seminar
AS.360.401 (01)

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore intensive semester of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Race and Ethnic Politics in the United States
AS.190.437 (01)

Race has been and continues to be centrally important to American political life and development. In this course, we will engage with the major debates around racial politics in the United States, with a substantial focus on how policies and practices of citizenship, immigration law, social provision, and criminal justice policy shaped and continue to shape racial formation, group-based identities, and group position; debates around the content and meaning of political representation and the responsiveness of the political system to American minority groups; debates about how racial prejudice has shifted and its importance in understanding American political behavior; the prospects for contestation or coalitions among groups; the “struggle with difference” within groups as they deal with the interplay of race and class, citizenship status, and issues that disproportionately affect a subset of their members; and debates about how new groups and issues are reshaping the meaning and practice of race in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Demons of Democracy
AS.191.348 (01)

This course examines how a political discourse of deviancy, which produces a suspicion and a demonization of the Other, has legitimized the subsequent marginalization of specific groups from the democratic sphere. How has democracy, which promises a universal inclusivity of all its citizens, justified the historical and ongoing exclusion of certain marginalized groups from participating in political life? In this course, we will gain deeper insight into the logics of “demon-making” by turning to Black, feminist and queer critiques of democracy’s core tenets, particularly the values of inclusion, representation, and diversity. We will pay special attention to these scholars’ critiques of the Rational Man, conceived by Enlightenment thinkers to be the ideal subject of political life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Najjar, Stephanie Hanna
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (01)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Theory of Conversation
AS.191.309 (01)

What are the purposes of conversation, and how do we navigate these purposes? How do we excuse, justify, and explain ourselves to one another; how do we forgive each other; how do we come to agree with one another? When do we reach the conclusion that we have nothing more to say, and why? In this course, we will approach these and similar questions through the tradition of ordinary language philosophy as represented by Wittgenstein, Austin, and Cavell. We will then apply the method of ordinary language philosophy to conversations found in the plays of Beckett and Shakespeare, as well as the films of Hawks and McCarey. Students will be expected to write a short paper each week.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Higgins, Christopher James
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

American Constitutional Law
AS.190.333 (01)

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Violence: State and Society
AS.190.421 (01)

This course will examine violence that occurs mainly within the territory of nominally sovereign states. We will focus on violence as an object of study in its own right. For the most part, we will look at violence as a dependent variable, though in some instances it will function as an independent variable, a mechanism, or an equilibrium. We will ask why violence starts, how it “works” or fails to work, why it takes place in some locations and not others, why violence take specific forms (e.g., insurgency, terrorism, civilian victimization, etc.), what explains its magnitude (the number of victims), and what explains targeting (the type or identity of victims).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Thesis Colloquium
AS.190.498 (01)

Open to and required for Political Science majors writing a thesis. International Studies majors writing a senior thesis under the supervision of a Political Science Department faculty member may also enroll. Topics include: research design, literature review, evidence collection and approaches to analysis of evidence, and the writing process. The course lays the groundwork for completing the thesis in the second semester under the direction of the faculty thesis supervisor. Students are expected to have decided on a research topic and arranged for a faculty thesis supervisor prior to the start of the semester. Seniors. Under special circumstances, juniors will be allowed to enroll. Enrollment limit: 15.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 10:00AM - 12:30PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Free Speech and the Law in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.366 (01)

This class explores the ideas and legal doctrines that define the freedom of speech. We will examine the free speech jurisprudence of the U.S. in comparison to that of other systems, particularly the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the Supreme Court of Canada.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen, Zackin, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP

Race and Debt: Living on Borrowed Time
AS.190.404 (01)

This is an advanced undergraduate seminar that explores how racial stigma functions as a marker of being always already in debt. In view of the legacies of settler-colonialism, imperialism and chattel slavery, how is it that those from whom so much has been taken are nevertheless regarded as perpetually in debt? We shall examine the moral, economic and racialized logics of power through which a range of political subjects come to be regarded as ungrateful “takers” as opposed to “makers,” and owing a debt to society. In so doing, we will investigate how temporality functions as a tool of power by considering how the indebted are made vulnerable to precarity, discipline, and disposability—in effect, forced to live life on borrowed time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict Responses
AS.191.317 (01)

The slogan "No Justice, No Peace" has been uttered both as a call to arms for social unrest and as a warning that a lack of perceived justice in a society will mean lack of peace. While the demand is made in a variety of contexts ranging from urban protests in response to racial injustices to states in the aftermath of protracted civil strife or state sponsored violence, a discussion of the kind of justice that is demanded with the slogan or the kind of peace that is foreseen is often missing from the public invocations of ‘no justice, no peace.’This course aims to examine invocations of “no justice, no peace” and mechanisms employed to respond to its demands. As such, the course readings will explore conceptions of justice and peace envisioned in a variety of post-conflict contexts. Students will be encouraged to evaluate and question the conceptions of justice and peace and the shifts in their meanings overtime through an examination of primary sources such as U.N. resolutions, Security Council Meeting Notes, UNCHR reports, international NGO reports, international tribunal reports in addition to seminal texts on the concepts of justice, peace and reconciliation. Students will be encouraged to articulate the ways in which response mechanisms delivered or failed to deliver the promises of justice, peace and fugitive reconciliation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Kirmizidag, Nur
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

The Political Economy of Climate Change
AS.191.347 (01)

Scientists tell us that continued reliance on fossil fuels to drive our economies causes global warming, which in turn poses an existential threat to humanity as we know it. But the major tools of societies to steer a clean energy transition—climate and energy policies—often fail, lack ambition, and vary widely from country to country. This is puzzling: Why is it so difficult to pass meaningful policies even though the stakes are so high? How to explain the varying responses to the same problem? In this course, students study the struggle over energy and climate policies through case studies of large industrialized countries. Besides other things, we will ask why the US failed to install any kind of meaningful climate policy, if and how the problems of the EU’s carbon market can be solved, why China cancelled over 100 coal-fired power plants in 2017, and why cloudy Germany became a solar energy powerhouse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kupzok, Nils
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-CP, INST-ECON, INST-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Social Entrepreneurship, Policy, and Systems Change
AS.196.301 (01)

This course will explore the dynamics and interplay between social entrepreneurship, social change, and policy. Students will explore frameworks for social transformation and systems change, and explore whether stable governance and effective policies are necessary for sustainable change. The course will examine the intersection between social change and policy change, examining how the two concepts intersect while focusing on the end goal of systems change. Students will examine different case studies of social transformation (or proposed social transformation) from across the United States and world. Guest speakers will include diverse practitioners of social entrepreneurship who think about long-term pathways to transformative social change, and dynamic policymakers. While the course will include case studies on broader domestic and international challenges and models of social transformation, a larger focus will be on specific local social problems and solutions. This will manifest through class discussions and a final project based on the surrounding community.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Warren, Scott L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

National Security-Nuclear Age
AS.190.329 (01)

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Queer Theory, Western Philosophy and Identity Politics
AS.191.321 (01)

The course focuses on sympathetic links between Western philosophers and queer theory in order to illuminate contemporary understandings of (gender or sexual) identity. The course identifies three strands of queer theory each with its specific understanding of identity and, consequently, each with its specific political solution to issues of persisting structures of patriarchy, homophobia, racism and capitalist exploitation. We begin in Ancient Greece with Plato’s seminal dialogue on Eros - the Symposium, which we will use to explore ancient Greek sexuality as a set of norms, practices, and identities that differ quite significantly from their modern counterparts. Thereafter, the course proceeds in three parts, each analyzing a specific strand of queer theory inspired by different thinkers from the Western philosophical canon: 1. Queer theory inspired by psychoanalytic thought of Freud and Lacan 2. Theories of performativity inspired by Foucault and Derrida 3. Affect and assemblage theory inspired by Deleuze and Guattari.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Skerjanec, Blaz
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Ancient Political Thought
AS.190.204 (01)

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Food Politics
AS.190.405 (01)

This course examines the politics of food at the local, national, and global level. Topics include the politics of agricultural subsidies, struggles over genetically modified foods, government efforts at improving food safety, and issues surrounding obesity and nutrition policy. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Politics of Outer Space
AS.190.443 (01)

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

State and Society in Modern India
AS.230.318 (01)

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Urban Politics & Policy
AS.190.384 (02)

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross-listed with Africana Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/27
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Parties and Elections in America
AS.190.387 (01)

Considers how parties and elections structure political conflict, and facilitate (or not) democratic control of government. Topics include campaigns, voting behavior, election administration, money in politics, presidential nomination, and party coalitions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Business, Finance, and Government in E. Asia
AS.190.348 (01)

Business, Finance, and Government in East Asia explores the dynamics of East Asia's economic growth (and crises) over the last fifty years. We will examine Japan's post-war development strategy, the Asian tiger economies, and China's dramatic rise. Centered on case studies of major corporations, this course examines the interplay between politics and economics in East Asia, and considers the following questions: How have businesses navigated East Asia’s complex market environment? In what ways can the state foster economic development? How has the financial system been organized to facilitate investment? What are the long-term prospects for growth in the region?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

The Executive Branch
AS.190.406 (01)

In the 19th Century America was noted for its courts, political parties and representative institutions. Today, America’s political parties and representative institutions have declined in importance while the institutions of the executive branch have increased in importance. This seminar will examine the nation’s key executive institutions and aspects of executive governance in the U.S. Students will alternate primary responsibility for week’s readings. Every student will prepare a 10-15 page review and critique of the books for which they are responsible in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (01)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

Geopolitics
AS.190.451 (01)

Intensive exploration of theories of how geography, ecology, and technology shape political orders. Case studies of ancient, early modern, global, and contemporary topics, including European ascent, industrial revolution, tropics and North South divide, climate change, geo-engineering and global commons (oceans, atmosphere and orbital space

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The University and Society
AS.190.471 (01)

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (02)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Capitalism and Ecology
AS.190.396 (01)

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/32
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (03)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Getting to Truth: How to Navigate Today's Media Jungle
AS.196.300 (01)

Our democratic system depends on an informed public, but media today are polarized along ideological lines, undercut by economic and technological change and sometimes polluted with bogus stories written for profit or spin. In this course, taught by a veteran journalist, we will discuss the evolution of news, examine the current challenges and assess what citizens can do to get a fair understanding of what's going on. We’ll use many concrete examples and students will have multiple writing assignments.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Shane, Scott
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Domestic Politics of Israel
AS.191.315 (01)

Israel’s politics and history are complex, involving multiple military conflicts, domestic struggles and dynamic international relationships. This course will focus on Israel’s domestic politics by tracing the story of the development of its party system and the parties composing it. A parliamentary democracy with a proportional representation electoral system, Israel’s party system includes multiple parties who represent the various segments of Israeli society. What are the origins of this party system and the parties within it? What changes have they experienced and what are the factors that influence those changes? Who are the important actors and what might be motivating them? How have these parties influenced the development of Israel’s domestic politics? Using both historical and statistical materials, these questions and others will serve as our guide on a journey to a better understanding of Israel’s domestic politics, from its inception to the present day.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Dolinsky, Alona Olga
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

North Korea, Identity, and International Politics
AS.191.359 (01)

This course analyzes the role of identity and foreign policy in contemporary North Korea. We begin with an overview of North Korea's political economic development and the role of national identity in state formation. We will then use those concepts to explore North Korea's relations with South Korea, China, and the United States through topics such as regime security, nuclear weapons, human rights, and social change. The course ties together academic literature, journalistic sources, and policy research with in-class activities and writing assignments. It is recommended that students have taken a survey course on International Relations (e.g., Global Security Politics, Contemporary International Politics).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Draudt, Darcie Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Political Violence
AS.190.412 (01)

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include terrorism, assassination, genocide, coups, rebellions and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them. (Formerly AS.190.372)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.190.102 (06)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (01)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (02)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.111 (01)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (03)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 7:30PM - 8:20PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.100.442 (01)The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to presentF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBurgin, Angus HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.190.102 (03)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (04)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (05)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.111 (02)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (04)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 8:30PM - 9:20PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.227 (02)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.227 (03)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.227 (04)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.307 (01)Race, Politics and LiteratureW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT
AS.190.137 (01)Freshman Seminar: Choosing a PresidentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLieberman, Robert C 
AS.190.180 (06)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (05)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.337 (01)Politics of the Korean DiasporaM 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, Erin INST-CP
AS.360.401 (01)Social Policy SeminarTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.190.437 (01)Race and Ethnic Politics in the United StatesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, Vesla INST-AP
AS.191.348 (01)Demons of DemocracyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNajjar, Stephanie Hanna POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.360.247 (01)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel 
AS.191.309 (01)Theory of ConversationTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMHiggins, Christopher James INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.333 (01)American Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, Emily INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.421 (01)Violence: State and SocietyF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew A INST-IR
AS.190.498 (01)Thesis ColloquiumW 10:00AM - 12:30PMSheingate, Adam 
AS.190.366 (01)Free Speech and the Law in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKatz, Richard Stephen, Zackin, Emily INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.190.404 (01)Race and Debt: Living on Borrowed TimeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT
AS.191.317 (01)No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict ResponsesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMKirmizidag, Nur INST-IR
AS.191.347 (01)The Political Economy of Climate ChangeTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMKupzok, Nils ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-CP, INST-ECON, INST-IR
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.196.301 (01)Social Entrepreneurship, Policy, and Systems ChangeMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWarren, Scott L 
AS.190.329 (01)National Security-Nuclear AgeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDavid, Steven R INST-IR
AS.191.321 (01)Queer Theory, Western Philosophy and Identity PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSkerjanec, Blaz POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.204 (01)Ancient Political ThoughtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, Jane INST-PT
AS.190.405 (01)Food PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSheingate, Adam SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.443 (01)Politics of Outer SpaceT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel Horace POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.230.318 (01)State and Society in Modern IndiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, Rina INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.384 (02)Urban Politics & PolicyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester INST-AP
AS.190.387 (01)Parties and Elections in AmericaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchlozman, Daniel INST-AP
AS.190.348 (01)Business, Finance, and Government in E. AsiaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMYasuda, John Kojiro INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.406 (01)The Executive BranchM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin INST-AP
AS.190.227 (01)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.451 (01)GeopoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel Horace POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.471 (01)The University and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H INST-AP
AS.360.247 (02)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel 
AS.190.396 (01)Capitalism and EcologyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William E INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.360.247 (03)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel 
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMPomeranzev, Peter INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.196.300 (01)Getting to Truth: How to Navigate Today's Media JungleTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMShane, Scott INST-AP
AS.191.315 (01)The Domestic Politics of IsraelM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDolinsky, Alona Olga POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, Robert POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.191.359 (01)North Korea, Identity, and International PoliticsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDraudt, Darcie Anne INST-CP
AS.190.412 (01)Political ViolenceW 3:00PM - 5:30PMDavid, Steven R INST-IR
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)T 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, Robert INST-IR, INST-CP