Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Antigone's Echoes: Activism and the Law from Ancient Greece to Today
AS.040.214 (01)

Where should the law come from, the individual or the state? What does it mean to apply a law equitably? How can one protest an unjust system? These are just a few questions that Antigone, long considered to be one of the most important dramatic works in the western tradition, has raised for philosophers and playwrights across the centuries. In this class we will read several versions of Sophocles’ Antigone and explore this character’s enduring relevance to theories of gender, performance, world literature, and politics. Dean's Teaching Fellowship course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Warwick, Ryan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (02)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (04)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (01)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (02)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (03)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (04)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (05)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (06)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Fictional World Politics: International Relations Through Fiction
AS.190.249 (01)

The plots and settings of fictitious works provide “cases” for the exploration of international relations theories. Incorporates literature, film, and works of IR scholarship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (01)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (02)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (03)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (04)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (03)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Colonialism and Foreign Intervention in the Middle East and Africa
AS.190.323 (01)

How did colonial rule and post-colonial foreign intervention shape the history and politics of states in the Middle East and Africa? The first part of this course focuses on the colonial period, examining the era of conquest, considering how and whether colonial rule differed from other types of ruling arrangements, and studying how people in colonized territories reacted to conquest and foreign rule. Part Two focuses on post-colonial foreign military interventions. Part Three considers the potential long-term consequences of colonialism and foreign intervention. The course focuses on British, French, and American imperialism. **This course is eligible for credit toward the Islamic Studies minor, but only if students relate their major research paper to Islam and also notify Prof. Lawrence at the beginning of the course of their intention to seek Islamic Studies credit.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Democracy And Elections
AS.190.326 (01)

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

America and the World
AS.190.331 (01)

This course is a survey of the unique position of the United States in world politics. We will cover the broader international relations literature on the dynamics of hegemony and empire, from work in the realist tradition to more critical approaches. The course will encompass security politics as well as the economic and monetary dimensions of American influence. Interested students must have at least completed one 100 or 200 level introductory course in international relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR

The University in Democracy
AS.190.332 (01)

From the founding of the United States to the COVID-19 pandemic, modern universities have evolved into expansive, complex institutions that play a variety of indispensable roles in the support of democratic societies. They educate citizens as well as specialists; produce new knowledge that shapes discourse and public policy; foster reasoned debate; and act as engines of social mobility. They also incite a great deal of controversy, criticism, and distrust, including for how they have performed these roles. In this course, we will study the centuries-long relationship between universities and democracy, and assess how successfully these institutions (including Johns Hopkins) are fulfilling their most profound functions today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Daniels, Ronald J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Constitutional Law
AS.190.334 (01)

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Korean Politics
AS.190.341 (01)

This course introduces students to the historical and institutional foundations of modern South Korean politics. Topics include nationalism, political economic development, civil society, globalization, and ROK-DPRK relations. Recommended students should take Intro to Comparative Politics or a course related to East Asia first. (CP)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Foundations of International Relations Theory
AS.190.346 (01)

This course is a broad conceptual introduction to international relations theory in a format that stresses close reading and critical discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field. By the end of the course, students will have a firm grasp of the core issues and debates in the field. The course is conceptually demanding; interested students should have at least completed an introductory course in political science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-PT

A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st Century
AS.190.347 (01)

“Can the United States and China avoid a new Cold War? One might think not given disputes over the South China Sea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, human rights, trade, ideology and so much more. Moreover, competition for influence in the developing world and American concerns as to whether China will replace it as the preeminent world power suggest a new Cold War is in the offing. Nevertheless, their extensive economic ties and need to work together to solve common problems such as climate change, nuclear proliferation, and pandemics argues against a continuing confrontation. This course will examine whether cooperation or conflict will define Sino-American relations, and whether a new Cold War—or even a shooting war—lies in the future.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Comparative Racial Politics
AS.190.355 (01)

This course surveys the major trends and approaches to the comparative study of race in political science and critically examines the link between race and politics. Topics include race and state formation, citizenship and national membership, immigration, racial regimes, and the political economy of race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

Political Arts: Dada, Surrealism, and Societal Transformation
AS.190.368 (01)

An exploration of the political aims, tactics, and strengths and liabilities, of Dada and Surrealism, as it operated in Europe and the Americas in the years between the World Wars, with a comparison to political conditions today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Chinese Politics
AS.190.370 (01)

This course is designed to help students better understand the politics of China. Lectures will focus on the tools of governance that China has employed to navigate its transition from plan to market, provide public goods and services to its citizens, and to maintain social control over a rapidly changing society. The course will draw heavily from texts covering a range of subjects including China's political economy, social and cultural developments, regime dynamics, and historical legacies. Students interested in authoritarian resilience, governance, post-communist transition, and domestic will find this course particularly instructive.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

Decolonizing Politics
AS.190.372 (01)

This course introduces students to the colonial logics that underpin key categories and concepts in Political Science. Working through four sub-fields – political theory, political behavior, comparative politics and international relations, the course also introduces students to alternative knowledge traditions, emanating from minority communities and colonized peoples, which seek to explain the stuff of Political Science via anti-colonial logics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Nationalism and the Politics of Identity
AS.190.379 (01)

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP

The American Welfare State
AS.190.380 (01)

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Trump. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP

Africana Studies Meets Public Health
AS.190.383 (01)

This course brings scholars from Africana studies into conversation with scholars from Public Health to discuss the colonial lineages and racialized effects of projects seeking to improve the health of populations. Students will spend each week listening to a themed, live conversation between Africana and Public Health scholars. They will then unpack the conversation, in relation to course readings, in weekly seminars. The aim of the course is to better understand the racialized and (post)colonial determinants of public health scholarship and policy from the local (Baltimore) to the global.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert, White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Urban Politics and Policy
AS.190.385 (01)

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross listed with Africana Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Right to the City
AS.190.386 (01)

Over the past several years the city has been the center of almost every significant political struggle we've had over the past several years, from Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter. Theorists, activists, and scholars have argued for a specific "right to the city". What does that right look like? What might it look like? How has it informed political struggle over space and time? This course will seek to answer this question.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP

China's Political Economy
AS.190.389 (01)

This course examines the most important debates about China’s political economic development. After exploring Mao Zedong’s disastrous economic policies, we will consider the politics of reform and opening under Deng Xiaoping, and finally conclude with China’s state capitalist policies across a variety of issue areas. The course will cover literatures on financial reform, public goods provision, foreign trade and investment, agriculture, corruption, business groups, and regulatory development. Where possible we will draw comparisons with the economic experiences of other East Asian nations as well as other post-communist states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 5:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (01)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (02)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Law, Morality, and the State
AS.190.395 (01)

Beginning with Plato, and using Nietzsche’s history of metaphysics as a guide, this course explores answers provided in Euro-American political thought to a central question in political theory: ‘Why should I (or anyone) obey anyone else?’ While critically examining concepts of power and authority, we will read, in addition to works by Plato and Nietzsche, works by Kant, Mill, Rawls, Foucault, and Bennett. This is an upper-division undergraduate writing intensive seminar limited to 15 students. Final grades will be based on three papers, one revision, and class participation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Politics Of Good & Evil
AS.190.398 (01)

The Politics of Good and Evil examines comparatively a series of classical myths and modern philosophies concerning the sources of evil, the nature of goodness and nobility, the relations of culture to politics, nature and the gods, the degree to which any metaphysic or theological faith is certain, and so on. It is a course in “elemental theory” in the sense that each text pursued challenges and disrupts others we read. Often the reader is disrupted existentially too, in ways that may spur new thought. A previous course in political theory or a theoretical course in the humanities is advised. A high tolerance for theory is essential. Texts on or by Sophocles, Job, Genesis ("J" version), Augustine, Voltaire, Nietzsche, James Baldwin, W. Connolly and Elizabeth Kolbert form the core of the class. Assignments: 1) One 12 page paper and a second 5-7 page paper, both anchored in the readings; 2) a class presentation on one text; 3) regular attendance and quality participation in class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH

The End of Whiteness
AS.190.418 (01)

This is a writing intensive, advanced undergraduate political theory seminar on racial formation. Specifically, the course explores the end of whiteness in multiple senses of the phrase. First, to what extent do the ends served by whiteness change, or remain continuous, over time? What power hierarchies and political goals has white identity been engineered to advance historically? We shall then examine the contemporary phenomenon whereby the end of white supremacy is conceived by some as the end of the world. This, in turn, will lead us to investigate how we should best understand white disavowal of threats of climate change and pandemics/health-care crises currently coursing through white identity politics. The last part of the course will be dedicated to exploring the end of whiteness in terms of the theories and practices potentially required to dismantle whiteness as white supremacy. Readings include Du Bois, Fanon, Painter, Baldwin, Moreton-Robinson, Hartmann, Olson

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Power
AS.190.450 (01)

Power is a -- if not the -- key concept of international relations, yet there is no single definition of power that is accepted by all scholars in the field. In this course we will critically examine definitions of power from classic and contemporary works of international relations, political science, and related areas of study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Political Polarization
AS.190.473 (01)

The American constitutional order, which was designed to operate without political parties, now has parties as divided as any in the democratic world. This course will examine explanations of how this happened, the consequences of party polarization for public policy and governance, and what if anything should be done about it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (01)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (02)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (03)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (04)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (05)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (06)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Asian Cities in Comparative Perspectives
AS.191.314 (01)

The postwar era marked the rise of Asian cities. Not only do Asian cities host more than half of the world urban population, the majority of world megacities are also located in Asia. Notwithstanding its unprecedented scope and speed, an urbanizing Asia also offers fascinating alternative routes to prosperity outside the Western world. How did Tokyo rise from the ashes of war to be the global hub of trade and technology? How did Singapore and Hong Kong transform themselves from small towns to global metropolises? Why do we see fewer slums in Beijing than in New York? To engage these critical questions of cities, students in this course will pursue two modes of comparison: comparisons between newly-developed Asian cities and early capitalist cities in the West and comparisons among Asian cities. The material in this course will mainly discuss cities in East Asia and Southeast Asia. Nonetheless, students are welcome to draw examples from Western and Central Asia in discussions and assignments. Part I of the course introduces key concepts and major theories on cities and urbanization. Through problematizing familiar concepts like urbanism, urbanization, development, and slum, students will develop a critical understanding of concepts that might be taken for granted in everyday conversation. Part II moves to more empirically-grounded discussions of Asian cities. Each week, we will study a set of cities under a particular theme, where students will learn to apply but also challenge the concepts and theories that we learned in Part I. We will explore a wide range of topics that are central to development in Asian cities, including developmentalism, neoliberalism, city-states, authoritarianism, uneven development, and globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Zeng, Nanxi
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Political Thought and the Horror of Theatricality
AS.191.322 (01)

Actors provoke horror in political philosophers: from Plato's flamboyant poet corrupting the youth of Athens, to the early Christian theologians equating theatricality with sodomy and satanic debauchery, all the way to the Enlightenment thinkers suspecting the licentious actors of working in secret to subvert the public fraternity. It seems that at the very heart of political philosophy there lies the figure of a perverted jester perpetually working to undermine the entire social order with his artful wiles. Is the political ideal of deliberative democracy permanently bedeviled by the phantasm of a cunning histrionic bogeyman turning our public debates into theatrical spectacles and inciting our reasonable citizens to degenerate into impassioned fools? Considering the various contemporary articulations of identity politics, inviting us to cast off our masks and to take pride in our authentic selves, could it be the case that, rather than ridding ourselves of this naive political fiction, we are merely reliving an extension of a two millennia old horror story of theatricality? Are we still subconsciously terrified of actors? Sign up to find out.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Vinketa, Darko
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Comparative Labor Migration
AS.191.324 (01)

This course will arm students with the tools necessary to unpack the dual-faced nature of globalized migration as both a domestic and international policy issue, as well as both a driver of economic growth and a target of discontent. To do so, students will encounter a variety of competing narratives, grounded in substantively differing worldviews and understandings of economic and social behavior, and gain an appreciation for the diversity of both labor migration policy itself and the interdisciplinary study of it using approaches grounded in Political Science, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, and History across a variety of geographic, political, and economic contexts. The course will give particular attention to the distinctive features of labor migration policy in regions such as East Asia, the Middle East, South America, and Africa, while also examining it from race studies, decolonial studies, and gender studies perspectives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tian, Yunchen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

States, Regimes & Contentious Politics
AS.192.150 (01)

This course introduces students to the study of politics and political life in the world, with a particular focus on the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Throughout the course, we will analyze the sources of order and disorder in modern states, addressing a series of questions, such as: why did nation-states form? What makes a state a nation? Why are some states democracies while others are not? How do people organize to fight oppression? Why does conflict sometimes turn violent? What are the causes of ethnic war? Drawing on a mix of classic works and contemporary scholarship, we will discuss the answers that scholars have formulated to address these and other questions, paying special attention to research design and the quality of argumentation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 34/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Kissinger Seminar on American Grand Strategy
AS.192.410 (01)

Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructors and space in the course is limited. To apply, email a one-page resume, one-page personal statement on why you want to take the class including how it contributes to your professional interests, and a writing sample of less than ten pages to KissingerCenter@jhu.edu. This course is an initiative of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS, meant to link SAIS with the undergraduate International Studies major at Homewood. It will expose exceptional undergraduate students to the study of grand strategy and the history of U.S. foreign policy. The bulk of the course will explore critical moments, themes, and people in the history of American grand strategy, from Washington’s Farewell Address to the statecraft of Donald Trump. The seminar will be rooted in applied history—the study of the past as a way of better understanding the challenges and opportunities of the present and future. It will also be interdisciplinary, drawing on international relations theory and contemporary policy studies. The seminar will equip students to evaluate and contribute to intense debates about the future of American grand strategy. In addition to regular classroom meetings, the course will feature events at the SAIS campus in Washington, DC, including meetings with current and former policymakers. Transportation between Homewood campus and SAIS will be provided. These sessions will be followed by a dinner hosted by the Kissinger Center.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis J
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

The Battle of Ideas for the World Economy
AS.192.415 (01)

This seminar is intended as a capstone intellectual experience for seniors and advanced juniors majoring in international studies. The course presumes some background in economics, comparative politics, and international relations. This course will hone your analytical and writing skills by exposing you to theoretically advanced forms of political economy argument in a “proposition-opposition” format. The seminar is organized around a series of thematic pairings, covering such political economy themes like free trade vs. protectionism, free market capitalism vs. socialism, democratic erosion vs. autocratic strength, hegemonic stability vs. US abdication of power, or whether the current populist wave has mainly economic or mostly cultural roots. Each segment will deal with a specific topic area. Our discussions will involve in-depth interrogations of the arguments of these ‘pro-con’ authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Matthijs, Matthias
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Social Entrepreneurship, Policy, and Systems Change: The Future of Democracy
AS.196.301 (01)

This course will explore the dynamics and interplay between social entrepreneurship, social change, and policy. Students will explore frameworks for social transformation and systems change, and explore whether stable governance and effective policies are necessary for sustainable change. The course will examine the intersection between social change and policy change, examining how the two concepts intersect while focusing on the end goal of systems change. Students will examine different case studies of social transformation (or proposed social transformation) from across the United States and world. Guest speakers will include diverse practitioners of social entrepreneurship who think about long-term pathways to transformative social change, and dynamic policymakers. While the course will include case studies on broader domestic and international challenges and models of social transformation, a larger focus will be on specific local social problems and solutions. This will manifest through class discussions and a final project based on the surrounding community.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Warren, Scott L
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Knowledge in Literary and Theoretical Perspectives
AS.211.362 (01)

How does what we learn and what we call knowledge matter? Is it clear what “knowledge” means? Does it have the same meaning historically, across different academic disciplines and in daily life? Never have such questions been more relevant than in these volatile times. This course offers a literary and theoretical inquiry into the matter of knowledge/s. Through works by authors from diverse, interdisciplinary traditions including German and American thought and literature, as well as critical, Black, feminist, and queer theory, we will address alternative epistemologies that operate with “partial” or “unfinished” models of knowledge. Thus, students will become familiar with difficult, influential material from various disciplines, while focusing less on judgment and more on dialogical aspects of knowing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Nitis, Maya
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Shaffer 2
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy
AS.310.305 (01)

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, Marvin C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Methods for Policy Research
AS.360.331 (01)

This course will introduce students to quantitative methods for studying social policy problems. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics and sampling, correlation and causation, simple and multiple regression, experimental methods, and an introduction to cost-benefit analysis. The emphasis will be on the selection, interpretation and practical application of these methodologies in specific policy settings, rather than with formal proofs. Skills will be reinforced by hands-on exercises using statistical software. Over the course of the semester, students will critically analyze policy reports and empirical research in a range of policy areas and learn how to present this research to a non-specialist audience. Finally, we will discuss the pros and cons of quantitative vs. qualitative methodologies. The course will conclude with group presentations that draw on all these skills. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Public Policy Writing Workshop
AS.360.366 (01)

This workshop is designed to hone the analytical and communications skills necessary for effective formulation and advocacy of public policy. Topics include how to develop op-ed pieces and other forms of advocacy journalism, memoranda, position papers, and grant proposals. The workshop puts special stress on how to make a clear and persuasive exposition of complex or counter-intuitive policy arguments in the market place of ideas, including the challenges of writing for popular journals and communicating to specific audiences both in and out of government. Students receive intensive individual instruction, including close editing of their work and advice on how to publish or promote it in the public sphere. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 11:30AM - 2:00PM
  • Instructor: Houppert, Karen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.214 (01)Antigone's Echoes: Activism and the Law from Ancient Greece to TodayMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMWarwick, Ryan 
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (02)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (04)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.220 (01)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (02)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (03)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (04)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (05)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (06)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.249 (01)Fictional World Politics: International Relations Through FictionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.267 (01)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 1:30PM - 2:45PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (02)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (03)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (04)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 4:30PM - 5:45PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.308 (03)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMazzuca, Sebastian L INST-CP
AS.190.323 (01)Colonialism and Foreign Intervention in the Middle East and AfricaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLawrence, Adria K POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.326 (01)Democracy And ElectionsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKatz, Richard Stephen INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.331 (01)America and the WorldTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchmidt, Sebastian INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.332 (01)The University in DemocracyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDaniels, Ronald J INST-AP
AS.190.334 (01)Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, Emily INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.341 (01)Korean PoliticsW 7:00PM - 9:30PMChung, Erin INST-CP
AS.190.346 (01)Foundations of International Relations TheoryTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSchmidt, Sebastian INST-IR, INST-PT
AS.190.347 (01)A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st CenturyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven R POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.355 (01)Comparative Racial PoliticsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMChung, Erin POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.190.368 (01)Political Arts: Dada, Surrealism, and Societal TransformationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, Jane POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.370 (01)Chinese PoliticsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMYasuda, John Kojiro POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.190.372 (01)Decolonizing PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMShilliam, Robert POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.190.379 (01)Nationalism and the Politics of IdentityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew A INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.190.380 (01)The American Welfare StateTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, Daniel POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP
AS.190.383 (01)Africana Studies Meets Public HealthMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMShilliam, Robert, White, Alexandre Ilani Rein POLI-IR
AS.190.385 (01)Urban Politics and PolicyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester INST-AP
AS.190.386 (01)The Right to the CityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester POLI-AP
AS.190.389 (01)China's Political EconomyTh 5:00PM - 7:30PMYasuda, John Kojiro POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.392 (01)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMMazzuca, Sebastian L POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.392 (02)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian L POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.395 (01)Law, Morality, and the StateTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, Jennifer POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.398 (01)Politics Of Good & EvilM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William E POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.418 (01)The End of WhitenessT 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.450 (01)PowerT 3:00PM - 5:30PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee INST-IR
AS.190.473 (01)Political PolarizationTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMTeles, Steven Michael INST-AP
AS.190.499 (01)Senior ThesisStaff 
AS.190.499 (02)Senior ThesisDavid, Steven R 
AS.190.499 (03)Senior ThesisMarlin-Bennett, Renee 
AS.190.499 (04)Senior ThesisZackin, Emily 
AS.190.499 (05)Senior ThesisBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. 
AS.190.499 (06)Senior ThesisShilliam, Robert 
AS.191.314 (01)Asian Cities in Comparative PerspectivesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMZeng, Nanxi INST-CP
AS.191.322 (01)Political Thought and the Horror of TheatricalityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMVinketa, DarkoGilman 50POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.324 (01)Comparative Labor MigrationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMTian, Yunchen POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.192.150 (01)States, Regimes & Contentious PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLawrence, Adria K INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraShaffer 3INST-ECON
AS.192.410 (01)Kissinger Seminar on American Grand StrategyT 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis JMergenthaler 111INST-GLOBAL
AS.192.415 (01)The Battle of Ideas for the World EconomyW 4:30PM - 7:00PMMatthijs, MatthiasGilman 132INST-ECON
AS.196.301 (01)Social Entrepreneurship, Policy, and Systems Change: The Future of DemocracyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWarren, Scott LRemsen Hall 101
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:20PMPomeranzev, PeterShaffer 303INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.211.362 (01)Knowledge in Literary and Theoretical PerspectivesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMNitis, Maya GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieShaffer 2SPOL-UL
AS.310.305 (01)Southeast Asia and US Security StrategyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, Marvin C INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, Gaochao INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.360.331 (01)Methods for Policy ResearchTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMMorgan, Barbara Anne 
AS.360.366 (01)Public Policy Writing WorkshopM 11:30AM - 2:00PMHouppert, Karen