Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

AS.190.111 - Introduction to Global Studies

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.322 - Future of American Democracy

For the most part, observers of American politics have not considered the possibility that the American democratic regime might be at risk. But the unexpected election of Donald Trump in 2016 and the subsequent course of his presidency have occasioned a great deal of uncertainty and anxiety about whether democracy in the United States is at risk and whether American political institutions can withstand the stresses of contemporary politics. This course will use the Trump era to explore the conditions that seem to threaten the stability of the American regime. We will begin by exploring the political circumstances that led to Trump’s rise. We will then examine what we can learn from the experience of other countries about the conditions that make democracy either robust or fragile. Finally, we will consider how a set of contemporary political conditions in the United States — extreme partisan polarization, intense racial antagonism, growing economic inequality, and expanded executive power — contribute to the challenges facing American democracy today and in the future.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.284 - Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.102 - Introduction To Comparative Politics

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Open

AS.150.404 - The Idea of Power

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.111 - Introduction to Global Studies

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.284 - Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.308 - Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.207 - The Power of Rhetoric

In a time when people claim language "has no preference to facts, truths, or realities," the power of rhetoric is both vilified and lauded in the strongest possible terms. According to some, rhetoric is responsible for the dismissal of everything from political dissent to science as a species of "fake news". By contrast, others argue public life cannot be repaired without a "restoration" of rhetoric. What are these people talking about? This cousre will help us figure this out. Students will be introduced to the art of persuasive speech, writing, and visual media so as to be prepared to critically examine and evaluate the claims made for and about the role of language in contemporary politics. Topics will include informal logic, appeals, fallacies, figures and tropes. Among others, we will read texts by Aristotle, Austin, Barthes, Foucault, Freud, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Zizek. In addition to a number of short exercises and writing assignments throughout the semester, there will be a mid-term and a final paper.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.334 - Constitutional Law

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.190.326 - Democracy And Elections

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.434 - Does Israel Have a Future?

Israel is one of the only countries whose existence is openly challenged. This class will examine the future of Israel focusing on international and domestic threats to its continued existence as a Jewish democracy. Outside threats to be considered include nuclear attack and the growing international movement to delegitimize Israel. domestic challenges include demographic changes, the role of religion in governance, and doubts as to whether one can be a Jewish state and still be a democracy. Lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms and from contemporary state deaths will be included. The course will conclude by considering efforts that Israel can undertake to meet the threats it faces.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: David, Steven R
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.102 - Introduction To Comparative Politics

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.346 - Foundations of International Relations Theory

This course is a broad conceptual introduction to international relations theory in a format that stresses close reading and critical discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field. By the end of the course, students will have a firm grasp of the core issues and debates in the field. The course is conceptually demanding; interested students should have at least completed an introductory course in political science.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.380 - The American Welfare State

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Obama. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.398 - Politics Of Good & Evil

The Politics of Good and Evil places a set of classic myths into conversation with recent philosophical and political work on existential questions. The myths include the Book of Job, Genesis (J version), two dramas by Sophocles, a selection from Augustine, and Voltaire’s Candide. Texts by Nietzsche (Thus Spoke Zarathustra), William James, (A Pluralistic Universe) and Connolly are then placed into conversation with both each other and these classic stories. Kohlberg’s The Sixth Extinction closes the class, encouraging us to think again about the relations between mythic orientations to responsibility, tragic possibility, nature/culture imbrications and the shape of contemporary life during the Anthropocene. Previous work in political theory is recommended. The course is devoted to “elemental theory”, in which diverse existential stories jostle each other and periodically disturb us, challenging us to explore new thoughts in a new world. One class presentation, two 10-12 page papers, and extensive class discussion.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Connolly, William E
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.406 - The Executive Branch

In the 19th Century America was noted for its courts, political parties and representative institutions. Today, America’s political parties and representative institutions have declined in importance while the institutions of the executive branch have increased in importance. This seminar will examine the nation’s key executive institutions and aspects of executive governance in the U.S. Students will alternate primary responsibility for week’s readings. Every student will prepare a 10-15 page review and critique of the books for which they are responsible in class.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.427 - Political Economy of Japan and Korea

This upper-level seminar examines some of the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese and South Korean political economy. Topics include nationalism, gender politics, civil society, immigration, and US-Japan-South Korea trilateral relations.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chung, Erin
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.431 - Global Climate Governance

This course will offer an in-depth study of the history and politics of global climate governance. It will examine the central actors, agreements, and policy proposals that shape climate governance.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.410 - Rastafari: Race and Resistance on a Global Scale

The study of race has in recent years taken a global turn, such that nationally-inscribed struggles over racism have been increasingly re-narrated as part of struggles over global order. In this class we will use the Rastafari faith to examine the challenges that this global turn presents to the study of race. Gestated in the 1930s Caribbean, drawing upon a long tradition of North American Ethiopianism, and rising to global prominence by the 1980s, the Rastafrai faith connects all corners of the Black world and far beyond. As such, an examination of Rastafari can tell us much about the prospects of - and difficulties in – overturning racism as a global ordering principle. Open to Seniors Only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.419 - Race and Segregated Time

This course explores how time, and not just space, is segregated along racial lines. We shall examine how racial injustices are experienced as impositions on human time, how resistance to racial inequality has often been figured in temporal terms, and what it means to think in untimely ways that challenge how the extended lifespans of racially dominant groups is contingent upon the foreshortened lifetimes of racial others. Readings will bring political theory into contact with contemporary experiences of race, such as: criminal (in)justice, environmental racism and the proliferation of human disposability. Recommended Course Background: One Political Theory course.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.499 - Senior Thesis

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project. Once a faculty sponsor has approved a topic, students must enroll in a three credit independent study during the fall semester of their senior year. At the end of the fall semester, if the faculty sponsor determines that adequate progress has been made and the project warrants further work, the student may enroll in the senior thesis (AS.190.499) which will be worth 6 credits.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: David, Steven R, Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.190.499 - Senior Thesis

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project. Once a faculty sponsor has approved a topic, students must enroll in a three credit independent study during the fall semester of their senior year. At the end of the fall semester, if the faculty sponsor determines that adequate progress has been made and the project warrants further work, the student may enroll in the senior thesis (AS.190.499) which will be worth 6 credits.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.409 - Research Seminar in State Politics

The United States Constitution creates a federal system that leaves a great deal of power in the hands of the individual states. Each year, the states collectively adopt nearly 20,000 new laws, an average of 400 per state, while the U.S. Congress in recent years has on average enacted hardly more than 150 new statutes. In terms of spending, state and local governments collectively spent $3 trillion dollars last year–almost as much as the federal government. The states are especially important in the realms of education, health care, environmental policy and transportation. In all these areas, to be sure, the states share power with the federal government but possess considerable discretionary authority. Despite the importance of the states, most Americans know little about them. Hardly anyone knows much about their state’s executive branch or legislature. In a recent survey, most Americans couldn’t say whether their state had a constitution (they all do). In this seminar we will explore some of the mysteries of state politics. Each student will develop a research project designed to discover something about the states that no one else knows.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.429 - The Political Bases of the Market Economy

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.440 - European Politics in Comparative Perspective

Europe has been in a sense the first testing ground for theories of comparative politics, but many outsiders now see Europe as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question conventional wisdom through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. We will apply the comparative method to the study of European politics today, and conversely we will ask what Europe tells us more generally about politics. We will see that Europe is still a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy and fundamental rights, the welfare state, class stratification, immigration and race, the role of religion; European integration and globalization. Juniors and seniors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.408 - Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development, current controversies, and its salience in international relations scholarship. Works in political theory and the international law literature will also inform our discussion. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students with previous coursework in political science. .

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.473 - Political Polarization

The American constitutional order, which was designed to operate without political parties, now has parties as divided as any in the democratic world. This course will examine explanations of how this happened, the consequences of party polarization for public policy and governance, and what if anything should be done about it.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.502 - Political Science Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.504 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.536 - Independent Study-Freshmen

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.506 - International Studies Internship

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.538 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.191.303 - Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law and the criminal justice system in the United States.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.191.340 - Cities, Space & Power

Gentrify! 80% of people live in urban areas. These locations are key for solving political dilemmas, including climate change, class, segregation, gender & immigration. This class explores all of these through the lens of gentrification. What does 20th century urban planning have to do with it? How can I talk to my friends about gentrification in Baltimore? Find out this and more!

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawton, Sarah Ford
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.540 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 0.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.191.347 - The Political Economy of Climate Change

Scientists tell us that continued reliance on fossil fuels to drive our economies causes global warming, which in turn poses an existential threat to humanity as we know it. But the major tools of societies to steer a clean energy transition—climate and energy policies—often fail, lack ambition, and vary widely from country to country. This is puzzling: Why is it so difficult to pass meaningful policies even though the stakes are so high? How to explain the varying responses to the same problem? In this course, students study the struggle over energy and climate policies through case studies of large industrialized countries. Besides other things, we will ask why the US failed to install any kind of meaningful climate policy, if and how the problems of the EU’s carbon market can be solved, why China cancelled over 100 coal-fired power plants in 2017, and why cloudy Germany became a solar energy powerhouse.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kupzok, Nils
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.191.415 - Fear and Loathing: Writing About Contemporary American Politics

This course is focused on reading, analyzing, and, most importantly, producing writing about the American political experience and contemporary events in American politics. We will use scholarly, print, and new media sources from different sides of the political spectrum, drawing on political and literary theory to inform our discussions. We will then try to do better: Students will write and workshop a variety of pieces of different lengths and styles, spending in-class time on peer critique, presentations, and writing exercises, which they will compile into a writing portfolio. We will discuss and write op-eds, memoirs, long-form book reviews, commentary essays, and satire. Throughout, we will devote considerable class time to critique and discussion of students’ writing. Readings will include works by James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Claudia Rankine, Hunter S. Thompson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Alexander Chee, Angela Nagle, and Omar el Akkad. We will draw on political commentary from sources ranging from The Washington Post to Jacobin to The Onion, through to Facebook and Twitter. Throughout, we will consider a wide range of topics pertinent to writing about politics, including questions of the make-up of the public sphere and diverse audiences, the use of voice and language, the deployment of facts and rhetoric, the place of fiction and humor in political critique, and the rise of fake news and trolling.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dutkiewicz, Jan
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.542 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.310.230 - Chinese Politics and Society

This introductory course will familiarize students with the major dynamics of political and social change in contemporary China since 1949. The course will be divided chronologically into four main topics: 1. The contested processes of nation-state making in modern China before 1949; 2. The making of the socialist system during the Mao Years and its dismantling since 1978; 3. The Reform Era transformation to a market economy with Chinese characteristics; 4. The dynamic relationships among the state, market and society since the new millennium. Students will explore how scholars have explained major political and social changes with reference to individual and collective rationalities, specific organizational and institutional arrangements, and specific strategic and cultural mechanisms of Chinese political and social habits.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: He, Gaochao
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.360.331 - Methods for Policy Research

This course will introduce students to quantitative methods for studying social policy problems. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics and sampling, correlation and causation, simple and multiple regression, experimental methods, and an introduction to cost-benefit analysis. The emphasis will be on the selection, interpretation and practical application of these methodologies in specific policy settings, rather than with formal proofs. Skills will be reinforced by hands-on exercises using statistical software. Over the course of the semester, students will critically analyze policy reports and empirical research in a range of policy areas and learn how to present this research to a non-specialist audience. Finally, we will discuss the pros and cons of quantitative vs. qualitative methodologies. The course will conclude with group presentations that draw on all these skills. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Barbara Anne
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.230.357 - Baltimore and Beyond

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.310.340 - Development and Social Change in Rural China

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: He, Gaochao
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.310.200 - Economic Growth and Development in East Asia

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.360.366 - Public Policy Writing Workshop

This workshop is designed to hone the analytical and communications skills necessary for effective formulation and advocacy of public policy. Topics include how to develop op-ed pieces and other forms of advocacy journalism, memoranda, position papers, and grant proposals. The workshop puts special stress on how to make a clear and persuasive exposition of complex or counter-intuitive policy arguments in the market place of ideas, including the challenges of writing for popular journals and communicating to specific audiences both in and out of government. Students receive intensive individual instruction, including close editing of their work and advice on how to publish or promote it in the public sphere. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.544 - Independent Research

Credits:
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.191.354 - Congress and Foreign Policy

This course is an introduction to the Congressional role in foreign policy. The Constitution grants the President the authority to conduct foreign policy. Yet it also gives Congress a substantial role in the shaping of foreign policy. The distinct roles are not always clear, creating an inherent tension between these two branches of government and efforts on each side to increase their power. This class will address the “rules of the road” in conducting American foreign policy and how they change. The class will go beyond theory to include case studies that show the tension between Congress and the Administration – including the Iran Agreement, Climate Change, sanctions on Russia and American policy towards Cuba. The course will include guest lecturers who work in Congress on the various aspects of foreign policy – including appropriations, intelligence, oversight and investigations. We will address the Congressional role in ratification of treaties and in declaring war. The class will consider the different ways that each branch of government approaches human rights, arms sales and sanctions. The class will also address the domestic political aspects of foreign policy – including the role of advocacy groups and special interests and the political use of Congressional investigations.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Frifield, Julia
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.191.363 - Populism and Politics

Around the world, from Italy to Brazil, and from Hungary to the United States, populist candidates are fundamentally changing the political landscape. In this course, we explore the nature of populism; investigate whether populism poses an existential threat to liberal democracy; explore the causes of the populist rise; investigate the ways in which populism is a response to demographic change; and discuss what strategies might allow non-populist political actors to push back.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.550 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.190.101 - Introduction to American Politics

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.101 - Introduction to American Politics

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.226 - Global Governance

Global problems like poverty, financial instability, human rights abuses, and climate change threaten both international order and human well-being. In the absence of a world state, these problems must be addressed by an increasingly complex, transnational network of organizations and social groups. First, we will aim to understand and explain how global problems are governed through detailed case studies of International Organizations and Non-Governmental Organizations such as the United Nations, World Bank, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Amnesty International and more. Second, we will critically evaluate the successes and failures of these organizations and explore the possibilities for improving democratic governance at the global level.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.227 - U.S. Foreign Policy

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.226 - Global Governance

Global problems like poverty, financial instability, human rights abuses, and climate change threaten both international order and human well-being. In the absence of a world state, these problems must be addressed by an increasingly complex, transnational network of organizations and social groups. First, we will aim to understand and explain how global problems are governed through detailed case studies of International Organizations and Non-Governmental Organizations such as the United Nations, World Bank, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Amnesty International and more. Second, we will critically evaluate the successes and failures of these organizations and explore the possibilities for improving democratic governance at the global level.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.282 - Authority and Liberty

Beginning with Plato, and using Nietzsche’s history of metaphysics as a guide, this course serves as an introduction to Euro-American political thought by analyzing the philosophical foundations of political authority. In addition to works by Plato and Nietzsche, readings will include works by Kant, Mill, Hart, and Foucault.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.204 - Ancient Political Thought

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.227 - U.S. Foreign Policy

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.250 - Statistics for Public Policy

This course is a short, intensive supplement to Thinking Visually About Data, designed to give students a deeper understanding of the basic statistical concepts needed to inform public policy decision-making.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Canceled

AS.190.265 - Comparative Political Behavior

An introduction to the study of political behavior, emphasizing electoral behavior in democratic countries.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.190.282 - Authority and Liberty

Beginning with Plato, and using Nietzsche’s history of metaphysics as a guide, this course serves as an introduction to Euro-American political thought by analyzing the philosophical foundations of political authority. In addition to works by Plato and Nietzsche, readings will include works by Kant, Mill, Hart, and Foucault.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Open

AS.190.315 - Asian American Politics

This course examines issues of political identity, political incorporation, and political participation of Asian Americans. Themes include Asian American panethnicity, the struggle for immigration and citizenship, Asian American electoral politics, political activism and resistance since the 1960s, and the impact of Asian Americans on the politics of race and ethnicity in the United States.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chung, Erin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 2:00PM - 4:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.329 - National Security-Nuclear Age

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: David, Steven R
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Open

AS.190.339 - American Racial Politics

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.344 - Seminar In Anti-Semitism

Jews exercise a good deal of power in contemporary America.. They are prominent in a number of key industries, play important roles in the political process, and hold many major national offices. For example, though Jews constitute barely two percent of America’s citizens, about one-third of the nation’s wealthiest 400 individuals are Jewish and more than ten percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress are held by Jews. One recent book declared that, “From the Vatican to the Kremlin, from the White House to Capitol Hill, the world’s movers and shakers view American Jewry as a force to be reckoned with.” Of course, Jews have risen to power in many times and places ranging from the medieval Muslim world and early modern Spain through Germany and the Soviet Union in the 20th century. In nearly every prior instance, though, Jewish power proved to be evanescent. No sooner had the Jews become “a force to be reckoned with” than they found themselves banished to the political ma rgins, forced into exile or worse. Though it may rise to a great height, the power of the Jews seems ultimately to rest on a rather insecure foundation. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.379 - Nationalism and the Politics of Identity

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.382 - Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Canceled

AS.190.405 - Food Politics

This course examines the politics of food at the local, national, and global level. Topics include the politics of agricultural subsidies, struggles over genetically modified foods, government efforts at improving food safety, and issues surrounding obesity and nutrition policy. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.190.425 - The New Deal and American Politics

This seminar explores how the New Deal, the fundamental moment in the post-Civil War United States, has structured politics and government across a variety of domains ever since. Topics include presidential leadership, executive power, political parties, labor, race, and the welfare state.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.396 - Capitalism and Ecology

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Connolly, William E
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.438 - Violence and Politics

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.442 - Civil Society

This course explores classic and contemporary debates on the concept of civil society and critically examines its analytical value in light of recent developments. Topics include the relationship between civil society, the state, and markets, the role of civil society in development and democratization, social capital, and global civil society. This course is open to graduate students from any discipline. Advanced undergraduate students must obtain permission from the instructor and are expected to keep up with graduate students during class discussions.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chung, Erin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 4:00PM - 6:50PM
Status: Open

AS.190.498 - Thesis Colloquium

Open to and required for Political Science majors writing a thesis. International Studies majors writing a senior thesis under the supervision of a Political Science Department faculty member may also enroll. Topics include: research design, literature review, evidence collection and approaches to analysis of evidence, and the writing process. The course lays the groundwork for completing the thesis in the second semester under the direction of the faculty thesis supervisor. Students are expected to have decided on a research topic and arranged for a faculty thesis supervisor prior to the start of the semester. Seniors. Under special circumstances, juniors will be allowed to enroll. Enrollment limit: 15.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 10:00AM - 12:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.412 - The Use and Misuse of Force

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include terrorism, assassination, genocide, coups, rebellions and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them. (Formerly AS.190.372)

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: David, Steven R
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.352 - The Politics of Global Development

Development is often assumed to be an economic issue. In this course we examine the politics of development on a global scale. We begin by looking at the colonial and Cold War histories of development. We then use these histories to contextualise contemporary development issues that directly affect international relations such as aid and debt, humanitarianism, food security, land “grabs”, migration and indigenous rights. The course also seeks to understand the ways in which the issues underlying global development have always connected and continue to connect the peoples and polities of the Global North and Global South.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.382 - Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PM
Status: Canceled

AS.190.451 - Geopolitics

Intensive exploration of theories of how geography, ecology, and technology shape political orders. Case studies of ancient, early modern, global, and contemporary topics, including European ascent, industrial revolution, tropics and North South divide, climate change, geo-engineering and global commons (oceans, atmosphere and orbital space

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.443 - Politics of Outer Space

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.333 - American Constitutional Law

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dagan de Picciotto, David
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.501 - Internship-Political Science

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Sty - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.503 - Internship-International Relations

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.535 - Independent Study - Freshmen

Permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.537 - Independent Study-Sophomores

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.379 - Thinking Strategically

Aitchison Students Only.

Credits: 1.50
Instructor: Mueller, Karl
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 5:30PM - 8:00PM
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.360.247 - Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.345 - Russian Foreign Policy (IR)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Freedman, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.376 - Public Policy Writing

Aitchison Students Only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Longman, Phillip
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 5:30PM - 8:00PM
Status: Closed

AS.191.119 - Freshman Seminar: Thinking Critically through the Global South

This seminar exposes students to tools for thinking critically about life and politics by introducing them to contemporary debates in International Relations and Political Theory that have been proposed by authors from the Global South. Topics include, but are not limited to: development, postcolonial studies, environment, knowledge production, and gender and sexuality.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zille, Tulio R
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.191.312 - The Politics of Personal Life: Work, Family and Consumption

This course explores various theoretical attempts to broaden the meaning of “politics” by examining three spheres of action typically equated with “personal” life: work, family, and consumption. The following questions orient our inquiry: what does the phrase “the personal is political” mean, and what sort of political solutions does it typically endorse? What can we learn about politics by studying family dynamics? Why do Americans work so much, and how does “work ethic” discourse promote punitive social policies? What is the relationship between our everyday acts of consumption and larger political phenomena such as climate change and racialization processes? What can theories of intersectionality tell us about such dynamics?

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Masin-Peters, Jonathan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.192.320 - Colonialism and Foreign intervention in the Middle East and Africa

How did colonial rule and post-colonial foreign intervention shape the history and politics of states in the Middle East and Africa? The first part of this course focuses on the colonial period, examining the era of conquest, considering how and whether colonial rule differed from other types of ruling arrangements, and studying how people in colonized territories reacted to conquest and foreign rule. Part Two focuses on post-colonial foreign military interventions. Part Three considers the potential long-term consequences of colonialism and foreign intervention. The course focuses on British, French, and American imperialism.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 2:00PM - 4:30PM
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.310.305 - Southeast Asia and US Security

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ott, Marvin C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.211.394 - Brazilian Culture & Civilization

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.315 - The Domestic Politics of Israel

Israel’s politics and history are complex, involving multiple military conflicts, domestic struggles and dynamic international relationships. This course will focus on Israel’s domestic politics by tracing the story of the development of its party system and the parties the compose it. A parliamentary democracy with a proportional representation electoral system, Israel’s party system includes multiple parties who represent the various segments of Israeli society. What are the origins of this party system and the parties that compose it? What changes have they experienced and what are the factors that influence those changes? Who are the important actors and what might be motivating them? These questions and others will serve as our guide on a journey to a better understanding of Israel’s domestic politics.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dolinsky, Alona Olga
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.382 - Thinking Economically

Aitchison Students Only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Boushey, Heather, Tucker, Todd
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 5:30PM - 8:00PM
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bennett, Jane
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.326 - International Politics from the Global South

This course focuses on the interests and preferences of developing countries in international politics. The formal and informal rules of international politics tend to favor the interests and preferences of powerful countries: richer states, with better technologies and superior military capabilities. Sometimes, however, the interests and preferences of great powers do not align with what the rest of the countries want, especially with states in the Global South. We will analyze what developing countries do to restrain the leeway of powerful countries, particularly when their interests and preferences conflict. The course is divided into four main sections: a review of the structure of international politics and the Global South, hierarchies of authority, tools to restrain great powers, and actors that try to constrain the leeway of these countries. Given the nature of the material that will be discussed, a previous course on either Global Security Politics or Contemporary International Politics is recommended.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Rodriguez Aquino, Jose Luis
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zackin, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.327 - By Any Means Necessary? Political Theories of Violence

Questions of violence are as old as questions of politics itself. Are politics and violence essentially the same or is politics fundamentally non-violent? Is violence the only way to achieve political change? Has the state been a force for eliminating violence and securing freedom or has it only created more conflict? Who gets to define what counts as violent, and for what purposes? This course engages such questions through a theoretical lens, often focusing on political actors and activists responding on the ground to these pertinent questions. It asks students to reconsider what they normally think violence, non-violence, and politics are. We will particularly investigate this angle through the lens of race and colonialism—reading such figures as Michel Foucault, Franz Fanon, Mao Zedong, Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and Ida B. Wells—as well as focusing on histories of state formation and state violence.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lester, Quinn A
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.191.313 - Why We Punish

A multidisciplinary exploration of the justifications and problems associated with punishment broadly defined, including prison sentences, personal acts of revenge, and military reprisals. Course texts will include international court cases, philosophical texts, and classic legal thinkers, in addition to fiction and news articles. Particular attention will be paid to when punishment is (or is not) cruel, deserved, or proportionate; when restraint should be shown; and whether it is desirable to abolish it altogether. Case studies will include the practice of solitary confinement, cycles of retaliatory violence in communal conflicts, the death penalty, and International Criminal Court efforts to punish perpetrators of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Writing intensive.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: White, Jonathan Mark
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.375 - Thinking Organizationally about Politics

Aitchison Students Only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: F 9:30AM - 12:00PM
Status: Closed

AS.191.381 - Education Policy

Aitchison Students only

Credits: 1.50
Instructor: Hess, Frederick
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 5:30PM - 8:00PM
Status: Closed

AS.191.383 - Visualizing Data

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ruffini, Patrick, Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Closed

AS.211.394 - Brazilian Culture & Civilization

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.191.405 - Modernity and the Slaughterhouse: Labor, Violence, and Animals in Contemporary Society

Steven Pinker opens his influential bestseller The Better Angels of Our Nature with the claim that “If the past is a foreign country, it is a shockingly violent one,” going on to argue that the contemporary age is one marked by relatively more peace and less violence than ever before. Drawing on a long tradition of optimist thinkers, he credits this civilizational progress to a combination of the intellectual legacy of Enlightenment humanism, greater faith in scientific rationality and technological progress, a strong system of states and social institutions, and the development of democracy and the liberal market economy. For Pinker, this account holds as much for humans as it does for animals, and he goes so far as to claim the emergence of animal rights as “another rights revolution” akin to civil rights and women’s rights. But does this account of modern society hold up under scrutiny? Or, more specifically, where does it fail? And how exactly does contemporary society relate to different forms of violence (against humans and animals) that it has not done away with? The historical processes described by Pinker have not only drastically changed human society, but they have also impacted how we interact with animals. The United States today produces and consumes more meat than ever, but most Americans live at an increasing geographic and perceptual distance from animals and the humans who work with them, relying on a system of industrial production and a complex division of labor. This course approaches the politics of this distribution of labor, violence, and human-animal relations from a site rarely considered in political analysis: the modern slaughterhouse. It engages with this institution as a historical and cultural object, using the story of its emergence and operation to ask broader questions about the politics of social change. We will draw on an interdisciplinary range of academic and non-academic works to explore a range of questions about the relat

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dutkiewicz, Jan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.360.247 - Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Freedman, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.191.323 - Transing Politics

This course is designed to explore transgender politics through multiple valances and to ask what does it mean for us to to trans politics. Although there have been countless examples of gender variance throughout history, the term transgender has only recently emerged to describe a variety of such identities and experiences. Throughout this course we will examine the politics of transgender lives, how they are represented at large, and how transgender individuals represent themselves. To do so we will employ diverse mediums including film, literature, and comics in addition to more standard Political Science texts.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Moskowitz, Perry Samuel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Canceled

AS.191.335 - Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Freedman, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.541 - Independent Study-Seniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.539 - Independent Study-Juniors

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.190.543 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Allan, Bentley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed