Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Politics of Display in South Asia
AS.010.382 (01)

Through an examination of colonial exhibitions, the rise of national, regional, and archaeological museums, and current practices of display and representation in institutions, we will explore how the image of South Asia has been constructed in the colonial, modern, and contemporary eras. We will engage with the politics of representation, spectacle, and the economies of desire as related to colonialism and the rise of modernity. Readings from postcolonial theory, museum studies, anthropology, history, and art history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, HART-NW

The City Course: Disciplinary Perspectives on Urban Life and Form
AS.140.364 (01)

This course aims, first, at enlarging our understanding of cities by looking at them from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and, secondly, at examining the distinctive ways of thinking associated with disciplines from engineering, the sciences and medicine to anthropology, sociology, economics, archaeology, history and literature. Baltimore and cities from around the world will provide resource material. Lectures, discussions, term projects.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Crenson, Matthew A, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (02)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (01)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (02)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (03)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

The Idea of Power
AS.150.404 (01)

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (01)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (03)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (04)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (04)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (04)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (07)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (08)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements of larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements of larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (01)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (02)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (03)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Politics Of Good & Evil
AS.190.398 (01)

The Politics of Good and Evil places a set of classic myths into conversation with recent philosophical and political work on existential questions. The myths include the Book of Job, Genesis (J version), two dramas by Sophocles, a selection from Augustine, and Voltaire’s Candide. Texts by Nietzsche (Thus Spoke Zarathustra), William James, (A Pluralistic Universe) and Connolly are then placed into conversation with both each other and these classic stories. Kohlberg’s The Sixth Extinction closes the class, encouraging us to think again about the relations between mythic orientations to responsibility, tragic possibility, nature/culture imbrications and the shape of contemporary life during the Anthropocene. Previous work in political theory is recommended. The course is devoted to “elemental theory”, in which diverse existential stories jostle each other and periodically disturb us, challenging us to explore new thoughts in a new world. One class presentation, two 10-12 page papers, and extensive class discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH

Arendt/Foucault
AS.190.403 (01)

This upper-level undergraduate writing intensive course brings together the work of Hannah Arendt and Michel Foucault to focus on their critiques of modernity and their discussions of political change/revolution. Although Arendt and Foucault are often understood as coming from and supporting different political theoretical traditions, the course will also explore ways in which their shared debt to the work of Friedrich Nietzsche illuminates sometimes surprising commonalities and complementary positions. There is no final exam in this course but in addition to reading assignments, students will be required to write three papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Politics of Information
AS.190.327 (01)

Considers global and comparative politics of information, information technologies, and the Internet. Examines governance of information (ownership of information, rights to information, privacy) and governance of information technologies (domain names, social media websites, etc.).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (05)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the US
AS.190.300 (01)

While policies were passed to ensure equal opportunity for racially subjugated Americans, the United States witnessed increasing stratification of wealth and income and deepening concentration of poverty, stagnation in closing racial gaps, and new forms of inequality posed by the striking upsurge in contact with the criminal justice system at the bottom of the skills ladder and concentration of wealth at the top. At the same time, the welfare state came under attack and faced challenges posed by an aging population, women entering the labor force, deindustrialization, and international pressures of globalization. Social spending withered in some areas while spending on citizens was increasingly likely to happen through tax expenditures and private means. This course investigates the politics around these developments and competing perspectives in debates over redistributive policies in the United States and their impact on inequality, particularly race and gender inequality. We will examine the contours of inequality and explanations for why it has expanded over the past several decades. We explore why the US is exceptional in both the level of inequality it tolerates and the generosity and types of remedies to alleviate poverty in comparison to its European counterparts and debate the role of race, unions, electoral politics and institutions. We investigate several specific cases of persistent racial inequality – concentrated poverty, segregation, and incarceration. We investigate both how policies have reinforced racial and gender divisions from a top-down perspective as well as examining under what conditions the disadvantaged contest inequality, exploring how political struggle shapes policy from the bottom-up. The last part of the course examines the consequences of inequality and social policy for representation and citizenship and how economic inequality affects political representation and responsiveness of elites to masses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Democracy And Elections
AS.190.326 (01)

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

The American Welfare State
AS.190.380 (01)

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Trump. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP

Imagining Borders
AS.190.335 (01)

What is a border and why do borders matter in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings which come from political science and other disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kripp, Jacob S, Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Constitutional Law
AS.190.334 (01)

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (06)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (06)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice
AS.191.303 (01)

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law, racial segregation, and the criminal justice system in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL

Writing Politics in an Age of Crisis
AS.191.304 (01)

We live in an age of crisis. Social, political, and environmental disruptions both in the United States and around the world are the new normal. How do we – as individuals, citizens, and scholars – come to understand these issues? And how should we write about them? This course is designed to help students improve as writers, readers, and editors for a world where powerful young voices are more necessary than ever. The substantive focus of the course will be on the dynamics of interlinked contemporary political crises and on the responses available to individuals to address them. We will read a variety of scholarly, journalistic, and literary sources to inform our discussion and inspire our writing. However, this course is designed not as a standard seminar, but as a writing workshop. Students will write and critique a variety of pieces of different lengths and styles – including a political memoir, an op-ed, a long-form critical essay, and a piece of speculative fiction - spending the majority of in-class time on peer review, presentations, and writing exercises, which they will compile into a writing portfolio. Reading will include works by Alexander Chee, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Mary Annaise Heglar, Hunter S. Thompson, James Baldwin, Dave Zirin, Elizbeth Rush, Charlotte Shane, and Teju Cole, among many others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dutkiewicz, Jan
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

European Politics in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.440 (01)

Europe has been in a sense the first testing ground for theories of comparative politics, but many outsiders now see Europe as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question conventional wisdom through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. We will apply the comparative method to the study of European politics today, and conversely we will ask what Europe tells us more generally about politics. We will see that Europe is still a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy and fundamental rights, the welfare state, class stratification, immigration and race, the role of religion; European integration and globalization. Recommended background: Introduction to Comparative Politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (01)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Political Bases of the Market Economy
AS.190.429 (01)

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH

Environmental Social Sciences meet Environmental Fiction
AS.191.325 (01)

The course pairs readings of critical texts addressing environmental crises with literary fiction broadly dealing with the relationship between the human and the environment. We discuss the ways narratives affect our understanding of complex global phenomena, and how the tools of literary analysis can help us unpack the rhetorics and values of both fictional and nonfictional texts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:15PM - 6:45PM
  • Instructor: Oulanne, Laura-Amalia
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (01)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore Area
AS.190.410 (01)

This course uses a community based learning approach to inquire into the presence of the Rastafari community in the Baltimore area. Most people will have heard of Rastafari through the music of Bob Marley. People might not know, however, that Rastafari emerges out of and has been part of a global history of liberation struggles. This course is co-taught with a local Rastafari organization. You will be intellectually and practically equipped to take part in a project of original research on the Rastafari presence in the Baltimore region, starting with the demonization of the movement in the 1980s “war on drugs” and including the movement’s response.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, CSC-CE

Congress and Foreign Policy
AS.191.354 (01)

This course is an introduction to the Congressional role in foreign policy. The Constitution grants the President the authority to conduct foreign policy. Yet it also gives Congress a substantial role in the shaping of foreign policy. The distinct roles are not always clear, creating an inherent tension between these two branches of government and efforts on each side to increase their power. This class will address the “rules of the road” in conducting American foreign policy and how they change. The class will go beyond theory to include case studies that show the tension between Congress and the Administration – including the Iran Agreement, Climate Change, the use of sanctions and American policy towards Cuba. The course will include guest lecturers who work in Congress on the various aspects of foreign policy – including appropriations, intelligence, oversight and investigations. We will address the Congressional role in ratification of treaties and in declaring war. The class will consider the different ways that each branch of government approaches human rights, arms sales and sanctions. The class will also address the domestic political aspects of foreign policy – including the role of advocacy groups and special interests and the political use of Congressional investigations. Most of these classes will be in Washington, DC to facilitate guest speakers. Several classes will meet at the US Congress.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Frifield, Julia
  • Room: Nitze Building N507
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics
AS.190.311 (01)

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Planetary Geopolitics
AS.190.423 (01)

With the tools of geopolitics, course explores political debates over globalization of machine civilization and changes in scope and pace, space and place, and role of nature in human affairs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Violence and Politics
AS.190.438 (01)

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Seminar In Anti-Semitism
AS.190.344 (01)

Jews exercise a good deal of power in contemporary America.. They are prominent in a number of key industries, play important roles in the political process, and hold many major national offices. For example, though Jews constitute barely two percent of America’s citizens, about one-third of the nation’s wealthiest 400 individuals are Jewish and more than ten percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress are held by Jews. One recent book declared that, “From the Vatican to the Kremlin, from the White House to Capitol Hill, the world’s movers and shakers view American Jewry as a force to be reckoned with.” Of course, Jews have risen to power in many times and places ranging from the medieval Muslim world and early modern Spain through Germany and the Soviet Union in the 20th century. In nearly every prior instance, though, Jewish power proved to be evanescent. No sooner had the Jews become “a force to be reckoned with” than they found themselves banished to the political ma rgins, forced into exile or worse. Though it may rise to a great height, the power of the Jews seems ultimately to rest on a rather insecure foundation. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Policy Disasters
AS.190.424 (01)

Investigates the causes of large-scale policy disasters, examining the role of ideology, psychology, organization design and political incentives. Examples may be drawn from the Iraq War, Bay of Pigs, Hurricane Katrina, the U.S. Financial crisis, Shuttle Challenger disaster. economic development policy, privatization, and the Great Society. Limited to seniors or with permission of instructor. (CP / AP)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP

The Politics of Sound
AS.191.305 (01)

What does politics sound like? Can sounds (sound waves, musical compositions, nonhuman voices, vocal timbres, …) carry or even create political meaning? Listening to such questions, this course explores the role of sonic and musical figures in the political theory canon, the influence of sound on political events, as well as the involvement of the sensing human body and a more-than-human environment in public affairs. To do that, the course (1) introduces the soundscape as a methodological framework for describing politics as an aesthetic experience; (2) addresses sonic ways to conceptualize political matters, such as nationhood, civic resistance, speech, power, identity and warfare; and (3) uses sound to reimagine democratic and ecologically sustainable forms of living‐together. The course combines readings in political theory with texts in cultural, sound and media studies. Multimedia resources (popular and classical music pieces, films, sound recordings, …) accompany the theoretical discussions and relate them to contemporary events. Assignments include short presentations, a soundwalk report, and a final paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Strack, Franziska
  • Room: Bloomberg 278
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Methods for Policy Research
AS.360.331 (01)

This course will introduce students to quantitative methods for studying social policy problems. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics and sampling, correlation and causation, simple and multiple regression, experimental methods, and an introduction to cost-benefit analysis. The emphasis will be on the selection, interpretation and practical application of these methodologies in specific policy settings, rather than with formal proofs. Skills will be reinforced by hands-on exercises using statistical software. Over the course of the semester, students will critically analyze policy reports and empirical research in a range of policy areas and learn how to present this research to a non-specialist audience. Finally, we will discuss the pros and cons of quantitative vs. qualitative methodologies. The course will conclude with group presentations that draw on all these skills. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Chinese Politics and Society
AS.310.230 (01)

This introductory course will familiarize students with the major dynamics of political and social change in contemporary China since 1949. The course will be divided chronologically into four main topics: 1. The contested processes of nation-state making in modern China before 1949; 2. The making of the socialist system during the Mao Years and its dismantling since 1978; 3. The Reform Era transformation to a market economy with Chinese characteristics; 4. The dynamic relationships among the state, market and society since the new millennium. Students will explore how scholars have explained major political and social changes with reference to individual and collective rationalities, specific organizational and institutional arrangements, and specific strategic and cultural mechanisms of Chinese political and social habits.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Social Policy Seminar
AS.360.401 (01)

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore intensive semester of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course investigates recent debates about being a person in literature and law. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Although our explorations will be focused on these questions, the genre of materials examined will be wide-ranging (including legal essays, philosophy, contemporary novels, and film). Texts will include novels by William Gibson and Lydia Millet, essays by John Dewey and Daniel Dennett, and films such as Ex Machinaand Her.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict Responses
AS.191.317 (01)

The slogan "No Justice, No Peace" has been uttered both as a call to arms for social unrest and as a warning that a lack of perceived justice in a society will mean lack of peace. While the demand is made in a variety of contexts ranging from urban protests in response to racial injustices to states in the aftermath of protracted civil strife or state sponsored violence, a discussion of the kind of justice that is demanded with the slogan or the kind of peace that is foreseen is often missing from the public invocations of ‘no justice, no peace.’This course aims to examine invocations of “no justice, no peace” and mechanisms employed to respond to its demands. As such, the course readings will explore conceptions of justice and peace envisioned in a variety of post-conflict contexts. Students will be encouraged to evaluate and question the conceptions of justice and peace and the shifts in their meanings overtime through an examination of primary sources such as U.N. resolutions, Security Council Meeting Notes, UNCHR reports, international NGO reports, international tribunal reports in addition to seminal texts on the concepts of justice, peace and reconciliation. Students will be encouraged to articulate the ways in which response mechanisms delivered or failed to deliver the promises of justice, peace and fugitive reconciliation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kirmizidag, Nur
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (05)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

The Battle of Ideas for the World Economy
AS.192.415 (01)

This seminar is intended as a capstone intellectual experience for seniors and advanced juniors majoring in international studies. The course presumes some background in economics, comparative politics, and international relations. This course will hone your analytical and writing skills by exposing you to theoretically advanced forms of political economy argument in a “proposition-opposition” format. The seminar is organized around a series of thematic pairings, covering such political economy themes like free trade vs. protectionism, free market capitalism vs. socialism, democratic erosion vs. autocratic strength, hegemonic stability vs. US abdication of power, or whether the current populist wave has mainly economic or mostly cultural roots. Each segment will deal with a specific topic area. Our discussions will involve in-depth interrogations of the arguments of these ‘pro-con’ authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:45PM - 7:15PM
  • Instructor: Matthijs, Matthias
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Kissinger Seminar on American Grand Strategy
AS.192.410 (01)

Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructors and space in the course is limited. To apply, email a one-page resume, one-page personal statement on why you want to take the class including how it contributes to your professional interests, and a writing sample of less than ten pages to KissingerCenter@jhu.edu. Applications are due by Monday, October 21, 2019. This course is an initiative of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS, meant to link SAIS with the undergraduate International Studies major at Homewood. It will expose exceptional undergraduate students to the study of grand strategy and the history of U.S. foreign policy. The bulk of the course will explore critical moments, themes, and people in the history of American grand strategy, from Washington’s Farewell Address to the statecraft of Donald Trump. The seminar will be rooted in applied history—the study of the past as a way of better understanding the challenges and opportunities of the present and future. It will also be interdisciplinary, drawing on international relations theory and contemporary policy studies. The seminar will equip students to evaluate and contribute to intense debates about the future of American grand strategy. In addition to regular classroom meetings, the course will feature events at the SAIS campus in Washington, DC, including meetings with current and former policymakers. These sessions will take place on February 10th, March 2th, April 6th, April 27th. Transportation between Homewood campus and SAIS will be provided. These sessions will be followed by a dinner hosted by the Kissinger Center.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Brands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis J
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/21
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

China Under Revolution and Reform
AS.192.280 (01)

China is an emerging world power with a long history, a rich culture, and complex political struc-tures and processes. As a modern state, the People's Republic of China (PRC) continues to amaze and confound observers both inside and outside its borders. More than three decades after opening its doors to the outside world, China remains as important as it is misunderstood. This course is de-signed to provide you with a road map to help understand the fascinating world of Chinese politics and the contemporary Chinese state. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

States, Regimes & Contentious Politics
AS.192.150 (01)

This course introduces students to the study of politics and political life in the world, with a particular focus on the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Throughout the course, we will analyze the sources of order and disorder in modern states, addressing a series of questions, such as: why did nation-states form? What makes a state a nation? Why are some states democracies while others are not? How do people organize to fight oppression? Why does conflict sometimes turn violent? What are the causes of ethnic war? Drawing on a mix of classic works and contemporary scholarship, we will discuss the answers that scholars have formulated to address these and other questions, paying special attention to research design and the quality of argumentation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/32
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Public Policy Writing Workshop
AS.360.366 (01)

This workshop is designed to hone the analytical and communications skills necessary for effective formulation and advocacy of public policy. Topics include how to develop op-ed pieces and other forms of advocacy journalism, memoranda, position papers, and grant proposals. The workshop puts special stress on how to make a clear and persuasive exposition of complex or counter-intuitive policy arguments in the market place of ideas, including the challenges of writing for popular journals and communicating to specific audiences both in and out of government. Students receive intensive individual instruction, including close editing of their work and advice on how to publish or promote it in the public sphere. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Houppert, Karen
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

North Korea, Identity, and International Politics
AS.191.359 (01)

This upper-level course examines some of the major debates and political issues relating to North Korea. This course will examine some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of North Korea. We will analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in Political Science in the context of North Korea: identity and foreign policymaking. A central aim of this course is to help students understand and debate the role of US policy in North Korea’s history and today through interactive activities that put the classroom knowledge—based on academic literature, journalistic sources, lectures, and discussion—into practical use through in-class activities and intensive policy writing assignments. The course will introduce students to the various schools of thought within International Relations as well as to the central foreign policy debates concerning North Korea, putting it in the context of the development of North Korea’s political institutions and interactions with its neighbors.It is recommended that students have taken a survey course on International Relations (e.g., Global Security Politics, Contemporary International Politics). Some knowledge of Comparative Politics or Asian history may also be helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Draudt, Darcie Anne
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Populism and Politics
AS.191.363 (01)

Around the world, from Italy to Brazil, and from Hungary to the United States, populist candidates are fundamentally changing the political landscape. In this course, we explore the nature of populism; investigate whether populism poses an existential threat to liberal democracy; explore the causes of the populist rise; investigate the ways in which populism is a response to demographic change; and discuss what strategies might allow non-populist political actors to push back.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Mounk, Yascha
  • Room: Krieger 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-CP, INST-AP, INST-CP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.382 (01)The Politics of Display in South AsiaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119HART-MODERN, HART-NW
AS.140.364 (01)The City Course: Disciplinary Perspectives on Urban Life and FormTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCrenson, Matthew A, Kargon, Robert HGilman 55
AS.190.102 (02)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.100.295 (01)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.295 (02)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.295 (03)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.150.404 (01)The Idea of PowerTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLebron, Christopher JosephMaryland 202INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.190.102 (01)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (03)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (04)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.220 (04)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.100.295 (04)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.190.102 (07)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (08)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMChambers, Samuel AllenHodson 210INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMChambers, Samuel AllenHodson 210INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.220 (01)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.220 (02)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.220 (03)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.398 (01)Politics Of Good & EvilM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William EHodson 311POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.403 (01)Arendt/FoucaultTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, JenniferHodson 313INST-PT
AS.190.327 (01)Politics of InformationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMarlin-Bennett, ReneeKrieger 304INST-IR
AS.190.220 (05)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.300 (01)Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the USTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWeaver, VeslaHodson 311
AS.190.326 (01)Democracy And ElectionsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKatz, Richard StephenKrieger 302INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.380 (01)The American Welfare StateTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, DanielAbel Wolman House 100POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP
AS.190.335 (01)Imagining BordersTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKripp, Jacob S, Marlin-Bennett, ReneeAmes 218INST-IR
AS.190.334 (01)Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, EmilyKrieger 300INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.102 (06)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.220 (06)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.191.303 (01)Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal JusticeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyPOLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL
AS.191.304 (01)Writing Politics in an Age of CrisisW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDutkiewicz, JanGilman 55
AS.190.440 (01)European Politics in Comparative PerspectiveT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 302INST-CP, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.499 (01)Senior ThesisStaff 
AS.190.429 (01)The Political Bases of the Market EconomyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, NicolasGreenhouse 113INST-ECON, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH
AS.191.325 (01)Environmental Social Sciences meet Environmental FictionW 4:15PM - 6:45PMOulanne, Laura-AmaliaGilman 132ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.308 (01)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 377INST-CP
AS.190.410 (01)Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore AreaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMShilliam, RobertKrieger 300POLI-IR, CSC-CE
AS.191.354 (01)Congress and Foreign PolicyTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMFrifield, JuliaNitze Building N507POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.190.311 (01)Disposable People: Race, Immigration and BiopoliticsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Mattin Center 162INST-PT
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHodson 213INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.190.423 (01)Planetary GeopoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceMergenthaler 366INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.438 (01)Violence and PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminCroft Hall G02INST-IR
AS.190.344 (01)Seminar In Anti-SemitismW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminMaryland 201INST-AP
AS.190.424 (01)Policy DisastersTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMTeles, Steven MichaelShriver Hall 001INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.191.305 (01)The Politics of SoundT 1:30PM - 4:00PMStrack, FranziskaBloomberg 278
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100SPOL-UL
AS.360.331 (01)Methods for Policy ResearchTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMMorgan, Barbara AnneAbel Wolman House 100
AS.310.230 (01)Chinese Politics and SocietyTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMHe, GaochaoGilman 313INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.360.401 (01)Social Policy SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLieberman, Robert CMaryland 201
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHe, GaochaoKrieger 180INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSiraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
AS.191.317 (01)No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict ResponsesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKirmizidag, NurGilman 381INST-IR
AS.190.102 (05)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.192.415 (01)The Battle of Ideas for the World EconomyW 4:45PM - 7:15PMMatthijs, MatthiasMergenthaler 266INST-ECON
AS.192.410 (01)Kissinger Seminar on American Grand StrategyM 3:00PM - 5:30PMBrands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis JMaryland 109INST-GLOBAL
AS.192.280 (01)China Under Revolution and ReformTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMMertha, Andrew CAmes 218INST-CP
AS.192.150 (01)States, Regimes & Contentious PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLawrence, Adria KGilman 50INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.360.366 (01)Public Policy Writing WorkshopM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHouppert, KarenAbel Wolman House 100
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraCroft Hall G02INST-ECON
AS.191.359 (01)North Korea, Identity, and International PoliticsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDraudt, Darcie AnneKrieger LavertyINST-CP
AS.191.363 (01)Populism and PoliticsM 4:30PM - 7:00PMMounk, YaschaKrieger 308POLI-AP, POLI-CP, INST-AP, INST-CP