Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Legal Fictions - Law and Humanities
AS.001.106 (01)

A legal fiction is a fact assumed or created by courts to help reach a decision. In this First-Year Seminar, we study how legal fictions and fictions about law work in order to examine the possibilities and limits of fiction’s (legal) power. Drawing from legal and literary thought, as well as plays, short stories, cases, and legal commentary, we critically explore the capacity of words to reveal (or conjure) some fundamental features of our shared worlds and discuss their impact in contemporary debates about justice. The course is designed with first-year students in mind and requires no prior knowledge of law.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer, Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: The Politics of Reproduction
AS.001.114 (01)

The idea that the “personal” is “political” finds no greater example than in the politics of reproduction. From inheritance laws, the rights of the offspring of enslaved peoples, or policies to reduce (or increase) fertility, the modern nation state has had a great deal to say about the use and produce of human bodies. In this First-Year Seminar, we will examine how formal and informal institutions have governed reproductive practices over the past 200 years. We will look at how family structures and economic development map onto fertility, and at how technological innovations in fertility control (including birth control and IVF) have influenced women's economic and political participation. We will also consider whether reproductive policies have differential impacts for LGBTQ households. Finally, we examine the “dark side” of reproductive policies -- not only sterilization campaigns but also the treatment of sex workers and sex-selective abortion -- to understand how state policies have divided households based on race, class, and occupation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Art and Mass Culture
AS.010.326 (01)

What happens to art after the widespread production and circulation of readymade commodities in the twentieth century? How does it contend with the technological developments—print media, photography, film—accompanying industrial production and urbanization? Focusing on procedural innovations central to the history of modern art—collage, nominalism, montage, conceptualism, and performance—and debates in art history about art’s “public,” we will ask how artists responded to, critiqued, and incorporated features of the industrial world in their practice. In particular, we will be interested in asking what kind of shared culture art attempted to forge against the homogenizing forces of industrial capitalism. Central to our inquiry is the repeated concern artists, critics, and theorists raise about the distinction between art and life, and about the importance to both of critical historical thinking. While introducing students to the history of modern art, this course also focuses on special contemporary projects by artists of color, theorized together using digital materials. Texts include Marx, Adorno, Benjamin, Federici, and Mulvey.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Ballakrishnen, Meghaa
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and Beyond
AS.060.157 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the texts and rhetoric of the movement that abolished slavery in the Caribbean. Among other topics, we examine: how the formerly enslaved represented their experiences of slavery; how abolitionism emerged across the West Indies, Cuba, and Haiti; and the techniques artists used to imagine radical, post-slavery worlds. Authors include: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Esteban Montejo, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, and Aimé Césaire (all texts will be available in English).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Loker, Evan
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

John Locke
AS.100.404 (01)

Seminar style course in which John Locke’s major works will be read intensively, together with some of his contemporaries’ works, and select scholarly interpretations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (02)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 114
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 305
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (04)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 203
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (01)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (02)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 306
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (03)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (04)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (05)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (06)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 313
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (07)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 186
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (08)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 180
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (01)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (02)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 313
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (03)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 302
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (04)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 306
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Ancient Political Thought
AS.190.204 (01)

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Race and Racism in International Relations
AS.190.255 (01)

This course introduces students to the foundational importance of race and racism to the construction of our contemporary global order. Topics include the Crusades, European imperialism, eugenics, Apartheid, freedom struggles, decolonization, and global development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

What You Need to Know About Chinese Politics (Part 1)
AS.190.264 (01)

What you need to know about Chinese politics covers the major scandals, political events, and policy debates that every China watcher needs to know. This first module of a two-semester experience brings together two professors, Prof. Andrew Mertha (SAIS) and Prof. John Yasuda (KSAS), with very different perspectives on China's past achievements, its political and economic futures, and the global implications of China's rise. The course seeks to give ample coverage to every major political question about China that is often missed in a semester long class. In addition to lively debates between the instructors, students can also expect guest speakers from the policy world, business, and the academy for a fresh take on what's going on in China today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C, Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (01)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (02)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (03)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (04)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the US
AS.190.300 (01)

While policies were passed to ensure equal opportunity for racially subjugated Americans, the United States witnessed increasing stratification of wealth and income and deepening concentration of poverty, stagnation in closing racial gaps, and new forms of inequality posed by the striking upsurge in contact with the criminal justice system at the bottom of the skills ladder and concentration of wealth at the top. At the same time, the welfare state came under attack and faced challenges posed by an aging population, women entering the labor force, deindustrialization, and international pressures of globalization. Social spending withered in some areas while spending on citizens was increasingly likely to happen through tax expenditures and private means. This course investigates the politics around these developments and competing perspectives in debates over redistributive policies in the United States and their impact on inequality, particularly race and gender inequality. We will examine the contours of inequality and explanations for why it has expanded over the past several decades. We explore why the US is exceptional in both the level of inequality it tolerates and the generosity and types of remedies to alleviate poverty in comparison to its European counterparts and debate the role of race, unions, electoral politics and institutions. We investigate several specific cases of persistent racial inequality – concentrated poverty, segregation, and incarceration. We investigate both how policies have reinforced racial and gender divisions from a top-down perspective as well as examining under what conditions the disadvantaged contest inequality, exploring how political struggle shapes policy from the bottom-up. The last part of the course examines the consequences of inequality and social policy for representation and citizenship and how economic inequality affects political representation and responsiveness of elites to masses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Smokler Center 213  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Asian American Politics
AS.190.315 (01)

This course examines issues of political identity, political incorporation, and political participation of Asian Americans. Themes include Asian American panethnicity, the struggle for immigration and citizenship, Asian American electoral politics, political activism and resistance since the 1960s, and the impact of Asian Americans on the politics of race and ethnicity in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Law of Democracy: The United States and Canada in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.324 (01)

The Law of Democracy refers to the statutes, court decisions, and other practices that govern the electoral processes. Although the United States and Canada have a great deal in common, they have approached many of the problems involved in institutionalizing democracy quite differently. Recognizing these differences should contribute to understanding both the strengths, and the problems, of the two approaches. Specific topic will include the right to vote, political finance, delineation of district boundaries, electoral dispute resolution, and the role of electoral management bodies and elections administrators.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

American Constitutional Law
AS.190.333 (01)

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room: Maryland 202  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Comparative Political Behavior
AS.190.338 (01)

An introduction to the study of political behavior, emphasizing electoral behavior in democratic countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Black Politics I
AS.190.340 (01)

This course is a survey of the bases and substance of politics among black Americans and the relation of black politics to the American political system up to the end of Jim Crow. The intention is both to provide a general sense of pertinent issues and relations over this period as a way of helping to make sense of the present and to develop criteria for evaluating political scientists' and others' claims regarding the status and characteristics of black American political activity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Race and the Politics of Memory
AS.190.388 (01)

This is a writing intensive, advanced undergraduate political theory seminar. The course will examine the politics of memory: how power shapes what is available to be remembered, the timing and occasions of memory, who is allowed to remember, and the spaces inside of which remembrance takes place. Specifically, the seminar will explore how segregated memory enables racial segregation and racial inequality. Toward that end, we shall investigate political and theoretical interventions potentially equipped to contest contemporary forms of racial amnesia haunting what some have labeled a “post-truth” world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism
AS.190.391 (01)

Since antiquity, global politics have been defined by the struggle between imperialism and anti-imperialism. This course examines the arguments that have accompanied this struggle, considering influential texts written to defend or to denounce empires, as well as contemporary scholarship on imperial and anti-imperial ideologies. We will focus in particular on how imperial conflicts shaped natural law, international law, liberalism, and cosmopolitanism, as well as the connections between imperialism and contemporary capitalism, development assistance, and humanitarian intervention. The fundamental questions for the course are: What is an empire? and What would it mean to decolonize our world, our international institutions, and our minds?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Simon, Joshua David
  • Room: Shaffer 2  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, POLI-IR, INST-PT

Nonviolent Resistance in World Politics
AS.190.393 (01)

In this seminar we examine the origins, dynamics, and consequences of nonviolent struggles around the world. How do ordinary people organize for social change? What are the differences in people power campaigns in authoritarian and democratic contexts? When does nonviolent resistance succeed or fail, and what are the political consequences of these outcomes? In answering these questions, we will study the central ideas behind nonviolent action, learn about the most important scholarly discoveries in this field and analyze paradigmatic cases. Students will choose a historical or contemporary nonviolent movement to interrogate throughout the semester, as we learn new concepts, theories, and empirical patterns to make sense of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Amat Matus, Consuelo
  • Room: Maryland 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Capitalism and Ecology
AS.190.396 (01)

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room: Hodson 316  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Food Politics
AS.190.405 (01)

This course examines the politics of food at the local, national, and global level. Topics include the politics of agricultural subsidies, struggles over genetically modified foods, government efforts at improving food safety, and issues surrounding obesity and nutrition policy. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies. A student who takes AS.190.223 (Understanding the Food System) in Summer 2021 cannot also enroll in this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Krieger 306  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The Executive Branch
AS.190.406 (01)

In the 19th Century America was noted for its courts, political parties and representative institutions. Today, America’s political parties and representative institutions have declined in importance while the institutions of the executive branch have increased in importance. This seminar will examine the nation’s key executive institutions and aspects of executive governance in the U.S. Students will alternate primary responsibility for week’s readings. Every student will prepare a 10-15 page review and critique of the books for which they are responsible in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues
AS.190.408 (01)

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development, current controversies, and its salience in international relations scholarship. Works in political theory and the international law literature will also inform our discussion. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students with previous coursework in political science. .

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Violence: State and Society
AS.190.421 (01)

This course will examine violence that occurs mainly within the territory of nominally sovereign states. We will focus on violence as an object of study in its own right. For the most part, we will look at violence as a dependent variable, though in some instances it will function as an independent variable, a mechanism, or an equilibrium. We will ask why violence starts, how it “works” or fails to work, why it takes place in some locations and not others, why violence take specific forms (e.g., insurgency, terrorism, civilian victimization, etc.), what explains its magnitude (the number of victims), and what explains targeting (the type or identity of victims).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/14
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Does Israel Have a Future?
AS.190.434 (01)

Israel is one of the only countries whose existence is openly challenged. This class will examine the future of Israel focusing on international and domestic threats to its continued existence as a Jewish democracy. Outside threats to be considered include nuclear attack and the growing international movement to delegitimize Israel. domestic challenges include demographic changes, the role of religion in governance, and doubts as to whether one can be a Jewish state and still be a democracy. Lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms and from contemporary state deaths will be included. The course will conclude by considering efforts that Israel can undertake to meet the threats it faces.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of Outer Space
AS.190.443 (01)

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Nuclear Weapons and World Politics
AS.190.454 (01)

An intensive examination of competing theories of the role of nuclear weapons in world politics and alternative global security orders. Focus on nuclear weapons and the interstate system, deterrence, war fighting, arms control, proliferation and terrorism, with select historical and contemporary case studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Political Economy of Gender
AS.190.491 (01)

Over the past two hundred years, with the rise of industrial production, growing educational attainment, and availability of contraception, women have entered the formal labor market in vast numbers. Yet despite advances, there are still important disparities between genders, often exacerbated by class and racial politics. This course unpacks the elements of the transition in the political economy of gender and examines its limits. We set out to understand women's labor in emerging industrial and post-industrial economies; the causes and consequences of women's political inclusion; gendered opportunities in the labor force including the persistence of pay gaps; and the formation of economic and political preferences across the genders. Theoretically, we will engage with Marxian political economy, neo-classical economic approaches, and the household bargaining literature to understand how political and economic institutions reproduce or remedy problems including the gender gap in wages, in political representation, and in women's economic opportunities. Throughout the course we will also engage with challenges faced by minority groups and by women in developing countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Teele, Dawn
  • Room: Krieger 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-CP

The Citizen and the Foreigner in South Asia
AS.191.306 (01)

This course will take students through the histories of belonging and non-belonging of the peoples that populate South Asia. This will involve examining the administrative as well as emotional consequences of colonial rule, the politics of legal and illegal identity documents, the continuing legacies of the partition of the Indian subcontinent, climate-change-related migration, refugee experiences and detention centers, and the dimensions of caste and tribal identities on citizenship. Towards the latter end of the course, we will examine how citizenship is an ongoing process that is intimately connected to national identity and competing ideas of who and what constitutes the nation. The course will end with considering some implications for development on citizenship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Dey, Nandini
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

The Politics of American Imperialism: The Founding to the Present
AS.191.308 (01)

Is there an American empire? In this course, we will investigate American imperialism over three centuries, placing at the center of our inquiry the contention that expansion has always and continues to be a crucial aspect of American politics. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of American imperialism and then move roughly chronologically from the decades before the Founding through the present, tracing the politics of each major debate about imperialism. We will pay close attention to the racial and economic processes that animate debates about American imperialism and mechanisms of imperial rule over time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Henning, Maye Lan
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Theories of Power
AS.191.316 (01)

The course introduces the most prominent theories of power in the Western political theory canon and the ways in which defining this contested concept also configures our understanding of politics and social life. Theories of power are divided into three broad sections, organized by way of the different images of politics that they project. In the first part of the course, we cover theories of power that convey a conventional image of politics as an activity (conflictual or consensual) between political actors on the municipal, national, or international stage. Here, we will read both the classical theories of power as domination (‘power over’) and those that theorize power as a capacity for social action (‘power to’). In the second part of the course, we examine the theories of power that express an expanded image of politics, as that which permeates social life: from workplaces, schools, and hospitals, to families and romantic relationships. Here, we study the ways in which our modes of being and social life are constituted by both local (micro) and structural (macro) power dynamics. In the last section, we explore naturalist theories of power that convey the most expansive image of politics as a material activity of nonhuman and human actants alike, constitutive of the world itself. Here, we dive into both the classical and contemporary accounts of power that help us come to terms with the political agency of (nonhuman) animals, viruses, electrical grids, ocean currents, and forest fires.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Vrdoljak, Tvrtko
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, Queer
AS.211.362 (01)

How does what we learn and what we call knowledge matter? Is it clear what “knowledge” means? Does it have the same meaning historically, across different academic disciplines and in daily life? Never have such questions been more relevant than in these volatile times. This course offers a literary and theoretical inquiry into the matter of knowledge/s. Through works by authors from diverse, interdisciplinary traditions including German and American thought and literature, as well as critical, Black, feminist, and queer theory, we will address alternative epistemologies that operate with “partial” or “unfinished” models of knowledge. Thus, students will become familiar with difficult, influential material from various disciplines, while focusing less on judgment and more on dialogical aspects of knowing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Nitis, Maya
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Staff
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course explores recent debates on being a person in culture, law, and philosophy. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Materials examined will be wide-ranging, including essays, philosophy, novels, science fiction, television, film. No special background is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy
AS.310.305 (01)

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, Marvin C
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (01)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Virtual Online Latrobe 107
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (02)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 302
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (03)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 109
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Policy Seminar
AS.360.401 (01)

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore intensive semester of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Shaffer 2  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Public Policy Writing
AS.191.376 (01)

Aitchison Students Only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 5:30PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Dagan de Picciotto, David
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Making Social Change
AS.191.372 (01)

Aitchison Students Only.

  • Credits: 1.50
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 5:30PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Thinking Strategically
AS.191.379 (01)

Aitchison Students Only.

  • Credits: 1.50
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 5:30PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Thinking Economically
AS.191.382 (01)

Aitchison Students Only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bahn, Katherine Elizabeth, Tucker, Todd
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Education Policy
AS.191.381 (01)

Aitchison Students only

  • Credits: 1.50
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 5:30PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Hess, Frederick
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Visualizing Data
AS.191.383 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 5:30PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Thompson, Lucas
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research and Inquiry in the Social Sciences
AS.190.365 (01)

How do we assess research in the social sciences? What makes one study more persuasive than another? What are the advantages and disadvantages of the main methods used in research in the social sciences? What are the elements that go into designing a research project? This course considers these questions, introducing students to the basic principles of research design.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP

Thesis Colloquium
AS.190.498 (01)

Open to and required for Political Science majors writing a thesis. International Studies majors writing a senior thesis under the supervision of a Political Science Department faculty member may also enroll. Topics include: research design, literature review, evidence collection and approaches to analysis of evidence, and the writing process. The course lays the groundwork for completing the thesis in the second semester under the direction of the faculty thesis supervisor. Students are expected to have decided on a research topic and arranged for a faculty thesis supervisor prior to the start of the semester. Seniors. Under special circumstances, juniors will be allowed to enroll. Enrollment limit: 15.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 10:00AM - 12:30PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Thinking Organizationally about Politics
AS.191.375 (01)

Aitchison Students Only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 9:30AM - 12:00PM
  • Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.106 (01)FYS: Legal Fictions - Law and HumanitiesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, Jennifer, Siraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
 
AS.001.114 (01)FYS: The Politics of ReproductionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaffGilman 10
 
AS.010.326 (01)Modern Art and Mass CultureMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMBallakrishnen, MeghaaGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN
AS.060.157 (01)Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and BeyondTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLoker, EvanLatrobe 120
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.404 (01)John LockeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 400
 
INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Krieger 304
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (02)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Maryland 114
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Hodson 305
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (04)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Hodson 203
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Krieger 308
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Maryland 202
INST-AP
AS.190.108 (01)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (02)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Krieger 306
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (03)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Krieger 308
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (04)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Maryland 202
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (05)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Krieger 304
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (06)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Hodson 313
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (07)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Gilman 186
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (08)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Krieger 180
POLI-IR
AS.190.109 (01)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 308
INST-CP
AS.190.109 (02)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Hodson 313
INST-CP
AS.190.109 (03)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 302
INST-CP
AS.190.109 (04)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 306
INST-CP
AS.190.204 (01)Ancient Political ThoughtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, JaneGilman 313
 
INST-PT
AS.190.255 (01)Race and Racism in International RelationsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMShilliam, RobertKrieger 308
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.264 (01)What You Need to Know About Chinese Politics (Part 1)T 1:30PM - 4:00PMMertha, Andrew C, Yasuda, John KojiroAmes 234
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.267 (01)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:20PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Krieger Laverty
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (02)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Gilman 186
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (03)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Krieger Laverty
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (04)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Gilman 377
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.300 (01)Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the USW 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaHodson 216
 
INST-AP
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMazzuca, Sebastian LSmokler Center 213
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.190.315 (01)Asian American PoliticsT 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, ErinHodson 313
 
INST-AP
AS.190.324 (01)The Law of Democracy: The United States and Canada in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKatz, Richard StephenKrieger 302
 
INST-CP
AS.190.333 (01)American Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, EmilyMaryland 202
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.338 (01)Comparative Political BehaviorTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, Richard StephenKrieger 302
 
INST-CP
AS.190.340 (01)Black Politics IM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, LesterHodson 216
 
INST-AP
AS.190.388 (01)Race and the Politics of MemoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Gilman 55
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.391 (01)Imperialism and Anti-ImperialismT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSimon, Joshua DavidShaffer 2
 
POLI-PT, POLI-IR, INST-PT
AS.190.393 (01)Nonviolent Resistance in World PoliticsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAmat Matus, ConsueloMaryland 309
 
INST-IR
AS.190.396 (01)Capitalism and EcologyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William EHodson 316
 
INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.405 (01)Food PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSheingate, AdamKrieger 306
 
SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.406 (01)The Executive BranchM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminKrieger 180
 
INST-AP
AS.190.408 (01)Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary IssuesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchmidt, SebastianGilman 217
 
INST-IR
AS.190.421 (01)Violence: State and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew AHodson 313
 
INST-IR
AS.190.434 (01)Does Israel Have a Future?T 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven RGilman 10
 
INST-CP
AS.190.443 (01)Politics of Outer SpaceW 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 211
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.454 (01)Nuclear Weapons and World PoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 211
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.491 (01)Political Economy of GenderM 3:00PM - 5:30PMTeele, DawnKrieger 304
 
POLI-AP, POLI-CP
AS.191.306 (01)The Citizen and the Foreigner in South AsiaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDey, NandiniBloomberg 178
 
POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.191.308 (01)The Politics of American Imperialism: The Founding to the PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHenning, Maye LanShriver Hall 001
 
INST-AP
AS.191.316 (01)Theories of PowerTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMVrdoljak, TvrtkoGilman 186
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)T 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertGilman 17
 
INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 302
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraGilman 75
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMPomeranzev, PeterBloomberg 276
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.211.362 (01)Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, QueerTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMNitis, MayaBloomberg 178
 
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 219
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffGilman 219
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSiraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
 
AS.310.305 (01)Southeast Asia and US Security StrategyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, Marvin C 
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.360.247 (01)Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBurdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara AnneVirtual Online
Latrobe 107
AS.360.247 (02)Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBurdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara AnneVirtual Online
Shaffer 302
AS.360.247 (03)Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBurdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara AnneVirtual Online
Maryland 109
AS.360.401 (01)Social Policy SeminarTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithShaffer 2
 
AS.191.376 (01)Public Policy WritingW 5:30PM - 8:00PMDagan de Picciotto, David 
 
AS.191.372 (01)Making Social ChangeTh 5:30PM - 8:00PMStaff 
 
AS.191.379 (01)Thinking StrategicallyTh 5:30PM - 8:00PMStaff 
 
AS.191.382 (01)Thinking EconomicallyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMBahn, Katherine Elizabeth, Tucker, Todd 
 
AS.191.381 (01)Education PolicyT 5:30PM - 8:00PMHess, Frederick 
 
AS.191.383 (01)Visualizing DataT 5:30PM - 8:00PMThompson, Lucas 
 
AS.190.365 (01)Research and Inquiry in the Social SciencesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLawrence, Adria KMergenthaler 266
 
POLI-CP
AS.190.498 (01)Thesis ColloquiumW 10:00AM - 12:30PMMarlin-Bennett, ReneeMaryland 114
 
AS.191.375 (01)Thinking Organizationally about PoliticsM 9:30AM - 12:00PMTeles, Steven Michael