Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: The Psychology of Mass Politics in the U.S.
AS.001.168 (01)

Taught during the election season of 2022, this First-Year Seminar looks at the deeper psychological motivations of the American electorate. We begin by discussing the meaning of democracy and establishing a common understanding of American democracy specifically, placing the current moment into historical and international context. We then gradually dismantle the "folk theory" of democracy that assumes all voters are rational and economically-minded. Instead, we apply theories from social psychology to understand some essential questions about voter behavior. Why do people vote? How do they understand politics? How are their feelings and judgments affected by their own identities, biases, information sources, and by the messages they hear from leaders? Why have Americans grown so polarized? What role do racial and gender-based prejudice play? Is American politics headed toward a more violent future? We use evidence-based research from political science, sociology, and psychology to answer these questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Mason, Lily Hall
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: The Right to the City - Race, Class, and Struggle in Baltimore
AS.001.177 (01)

Over the past decade, cities have become more important than ever before. Protests against policing, against increasing inequality, as well as attempts to rollback societal shifts all have the city as its core. While some suggest these struggles represent larger struggles over the relationship between labor and capital, Black Radical thinkers connect these struggles to anti-black racism. In the wake of one world challenging movement – Black Lives Matter – and one world altering crisis – the Covid-19 pandemic - this First-Year Seminar will reflect critically on these two traditions of thinking about the city by using Baltimore as a case study. This class will be taught alongside similar courses at other universities, offering students a deep dive into Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Gilman 377
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (02)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Gilman 186
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Krieger 306
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (04)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Gilman 377
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Hodson 313
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (01)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (02)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (03)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Gilman 119
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (04)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Gilman 219
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (01)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (02)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (03)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (04)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (05)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (06)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

The American Presidency
AS.190.228 (01)

Over the past several decades, the power and importance of America’s presidency have greatly expanded . Of course, presidential history includes both ups and downs, some coinciding with the rise and fall of national party systems and others linked to specific problems, issues, and personalities. We should train our analytic eyes, however, to see beneath the surface of day-to-day and even decade-to-decade political turbulence. We should focus, instead, on the pronounced secular trend of more than two and a quarter centuries of American history. Two hundred years ago, presidents were weak and often bullied by Congress. Today, presidents are powerful and often thumb their noses at Congress and the courts. For better or worse, we have entered a presidentialist era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, POLI-CP

Political Thought in the Americas
AS.190.328 (01)

Reflection on political ideas and institutions in the United States is often oriented by the notion that the US is in some sense exceptional. For some commentators, the US is exceptionally democratic, exceptionally stable, exceptionally productive, and exceptionally innovative. For others, the US is exceptionally racist, exceptionally unequal, exceptionally violent, and exceptionally unhealthy. What both sides share is a common point of comparative reference in Europe. For all these commentators, Europe is the norm against which all of the exceptional qualities of the US stand out. In this course, we will ask how well notions of US exceptionalism stand up against the different comparative references found in the Americas, focusing in particular on the history of political thought in the Americas. We’ll begin by studying texts from the pre-colonial and colonial periods, noting similarities and differences between the political institutions, economies, and social and racial hierarchies of in the regions that comprised British, Spanish, Portuguese, and French America. Next, we’ll consider the US, Latin American, and Caribbean independence movements, early constitutionalism, and debates on women’s role in society, slavery, and the rights of Indigenous Americans, asking what, if anything, distinguished the US from its neighbors in its early years. Finally, we’ll examine theories of imperialism, racism, patriarchy, exploitation, and environmental destruction that have emerged from the Americas in the course of the 20th century, to see how both shared and divergent historical experiences have shaped perspectives relevant to contemporary political issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Simon, Josh David
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

American Constitutional Law
AS.190.333 (01)

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Political Violence
AS.190.350 (01)

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include civil wars, targeted killings, terrorism, ethnic conflict and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Free Speech and the Law in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.366 (01)

This class explores the ideas and legal doctrines that define the freedom of speech. We will examine the free speech jurisprudence of the U.S. in comparison to that of other systems, particularly the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the Supreme Court of Canada.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, POLI-CP

Geopolitics
AS.190.451 (01)

Intensive exploration of theories of how geography, ecology, and technology shape political orders. Case studies of ancient, early modern, global, and contemporary topics, including European ascent, industrial revolution, tropics and North South divide, climate change, geo-engineering and global commons (oceans, atmosphere and orbital space

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-PT, POLI-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Nuclear Weapons and World Politics
AS.190.454 (01)

An intensive examination of competing theories of the role of nuclear weapons in world politics and alternative global security orders. Focus on nuclear weapons and the interstate system, deterrence, war fighting, arms control, proliferation and terrorism, with select historical and contemporary case studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/40
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

The University and Society
AS.190.471 (01)

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Shaffer 2  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Political Polarization
AS.190.473 (01)

The American constitutional order, which was designed to operate without political parties, now has parties as divided as any in the democratic world. This course will examine explanations of how this happened, the consequences of party polarization for public policy and governance, and what if anything should be done about it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
  • Room: Hodson 213  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Philosophy of Law
AS.190.474 (01)

The philosophy of law or jurisprudence investigates the nature of law and what makes law, as it were, law. Thus, this course will examine various ways in which law has been defined and understood. It will also consider how law is distinguished from other systems of norms and values, such as morality, and how law is distinguished from other aspects of government, such as politics. In addition, the course will introduce students to discussions of legal reasoning and interpretation. Students will be required to participate in class discussion, take three exams, and write one paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

The Politics of Migration Control
AS.191.342 (01)

Today, immigration control is an almost ubiquitous global phenomenon. It exists in the deserts of the Sahel, shores of Morocco, airports in Korea and islands of the coast of Australia. This course will introduce students to the global phenomenon of migration control. Why does immigration control exist? What is the purpose of immigration control? What does migration control look like in different countries? Students will learn about the different forms of migration control and the actors involved; what it means to be live with migration control; the colonial histories of migration control; the racial underpinnings of it; and the way it is legitimized through certain representations of migrants.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Axster, Sabrina Diana
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Queer Marxism
AS.191.346 (01)

Ever since queer theory emerged as a distinct field of critical inquiry in the early 1990s, its relationship to Marxism has been fraught. Marxian insistence on the primacy of production relations in structuring social reality has turned many queer theorists away from Marx in search of an understanding of how regimes of sexual normalcy operate to conserve a world of gender binarism organized into heterosexual domestic units. However, in the course of the last decade, the global social crisis has left many critics reexamining the relevance of Marx for grappling with issues of sexuality, reproduction and normalization, culminating in a seminal work by Kevin Floyd proposing a path Towards a Queer Marxism. If normality is not a fact of nature but a value relation that is socially produced, as queer theory has insisted from its inception, then Marx’s account of how our societies produce value might prove useful for queer theorizing. This course explores an emerging field of scholarship appearing under the banner of Queer Marxism. It examines theories, mechanisms and processes of social production and reproduction as they apply to family structures, sexual subcultures, child rearing, organization and distribution of labor, and gender embodiment, all the while having in mind the difficult questions about the possibilities for social change in a wider material world in which we are situated.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Vinketa, Darko
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Race, Class, and America
AS.191.352 (01)

Through an intensive and in-depth reading of theorists, thinkers, historians, and political scientists, this course will take students through the deeply interconnected story of American race relations and labor politics. We will examine primary source material, such as the essays of Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison, the speeches of A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, and Martin Luther King, Jr., the memoirs of Charles Denby and Angelo Herndon, and the pamphlets of Claudia Jones; we will read historical accounts which situate these figures in their context; and we will engage critically with the fundamental topic: in the United States, what is the relationship between race and class; racism and exploitation; civil rights and labor activism? Toward the end of the course, we will examine recent scholarship that has returned to these themes to show how deeply imbricated America—its people, its institutions, its political economy—remains to this history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Mann, Thomas Joseph
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT

Use of Force and the American State
AS.191.358 (01)

This course examines the growth and development of the American state’s coercive institutions, namely, the military and police. We will explore the ways in which the American state makes war, fights crime, and polices the boundaries of citizenship. While we tend to approach these topics from the perspective of international relations, law, or political philosophy, this course focuses on American politics and institutions. How did the United States secure control over a transcontinental territory in the absence of a large standing army? Why did the federal government try to criminalize vices, and how were these statutes enforced? How did violence influence the development of the American state, and to what extent do these historical processes explain warfare and law enforcement today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Butron, Juliana
  • Room: Krieger 306  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

States, Regimes & Contentious Politics
AS.192.150 (01)

This course, which satisfies the gateway requirement for the major in International Studies, introduces students to the study of politics and political life in the world, with a particular focus on the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Throughout the course, we will analyze the sources of order and disorder in modern states, addressing a series of questions, such as: why did nation-states form? What makes a state a nation? Why are some states democracies while others are not? How do people organize to fight oppression? Why does conflict sometimes turn violent? What are the causes of ethnic war? Drawing on a mix of classic works and contemporary scholarship, we will discuss the answers that scholars have formulated to address these and other questions, paying special attention to research design and the quality of argumentation. This course also counts as a 100-level course in comparative politics required for political science majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room: Shaffer 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 50/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora Maria Dora
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

Did you know that Brazil is very similar to the United States? This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, politics, economy, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how Indigenous, Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required). No Prereq. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

Did you know that Brazil is very similar to the United States? This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, politics, economy, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how Indigenous, Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required). No Prereq. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National Security
AS.310.305 (01)

The global political and security landscape of the 21st century will be shaped by the rivalry between two superpowers -- China and the U.S. For the foreseeable future, the geographic focus of that contest will be Southeast Asia and the surrounding maritime space, particularly the South China Sea. Southeast Asia is a complex, highly differentiated region of ten-plus nations, each with its own unique history and relationship with China. This course will introduce Southeast Asia as a key region -- geographically, economically, and strategically -- often overlooked by policymakers and scholars. It will also focus on the craft of national security strategy as the best tool for understanding the multi-sided competition, already well underway involving China, the U.S., and the Southeast Asian states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, marvin C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Eurasia's Transformation and the Global Implications
AS.310.318 (01)

Eurasia, stretching from the Western Europe across Russia, Central Asia, and China to the Pacific, is by far the largest continent on earth, with a massive share of global population, economic output, and key natural resources. It has been traditionally Balkanized. Yet since the late 1970s, due to China’s modernizations, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and a series of global geo-economic shocks, the nations of this Super Continent have become increasingly interactive, creating fluid new trans-regional political-economic patterns that remain remarkably unexplored. This course explores the critical junctures that made Eurasia the dynamic, growing colossus that it is becoming today, as well as the global implications, from a unique problem-oriented perspective. It looks first at the developmental and political challenges confronting China, Russia, and key European states as the Cold War waned, how the key nations coped, and how they might have evolved differently. It then considers the new challenges of the post-Cold War world, and how national and local leaders are responding today. Particular attention is given, in this problem—centric approach, to the challenges that growing Eurasian continental connectivity, epitomized in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, are creating for US foreign policy and for the grand strategy of American allies in NATO, Japan, and Korea. Note: Some familiarity with Eurasian history and/or politics is recommended

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Kent
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.326 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Frantz Fanon's Global Politics: Racism, Madness, and Colonialism
AS.190.476 (01)

“The abnormal is he who demands, appeals, and begs” – Frantz Fanon. This course explores the writings and politics of Frantz Fanon, the radical anti-colonial author, psychiatrist, diplomat, and revolutionary who inspired decolonial and anti-racist struggles across the globe. We will situate Fanon’s writings in the global historical context of decolonization, and ask how they can illuminate contemporary questions of madness, racism, fascism, and empire. In addition to reading Fanon’s work, we will trace his influence on radical social movements, political thought, and global politics, and explore the limits and promises of culture, art, and film for social transformation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kripp, Jacob S
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, POLI-IR

FYS: Master of the Senate
AS.001.150 (01)

This First-Year Seminar offers an opportunity to think through the nature of political power, political institutions, and political ambition. We make our way through a single book: Robert Caro, Master of the Senate, an account of Lyndon Baines Johnson’s dozen years in the US Senate, from 1949 to 1961. Through lively discussion centered around this completely riveting text, the class will explore central questions in politics (democratic and non-democratic) that reverberate far beyond the bygone world of the midcentury Senate.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 1:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

American Leviathan: Conservative State-Building in the United States
AS.191.334 (01)

Judging by institutional capabilities, modern conservative state-building is the most ambitious project ever undertaken by the American government, or perhaps any government in history. This seminar-style course will trace the emergence and unique features of this American Leviathan, encompassing the institutions dedicated to enforcement and national security as well as conservative visions of social policy. In our discussions, we will look at how and why these programs and agencies manage to claim resources and attract unrivaled political support. As we move through sections designed to consider the major components of conservative state-building, we will look for patterns in the presentation of mission, leadership style, and modes of operation. Our review will include analysis of those times when conservative state-building encounters or engenders controversy. These moments of conflict and debate will provide leverage to critique, and to better understand, the remarkable record of political success amassed by these institutions and policies, allowing us to pose questions regarding the function, consequences, and future viability of the conservative approach to the modern American state.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Free Speech and Its Limits
AS.001.135 (01)

Freedom of speech is a core value for democracies -- and for universities, in which the freedom to challenge accepted beliefs is essential to advancing knowledge. The 1st Amendment to the US Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and of the press, as do the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the European Convention on Human Rights. But like other rights, my right to freedom of speech may conflict with yours, or with other important rights or societal objectives. As a result, freedom of speech cannot be (and in practice never is) unlimited. In this First-Year Seminar, we will be asking why freedom of speech has been accorded such importance, and how and why it might legitimately be limited, in politics, in business, in everyday life, and in universities, looking both at the United States and at other liberal democracies. Topics will include asking what should count as speech beyond the mere utterance of words; appropriate protections or limitations for hate speech and other offensive speech and for falsehoods; where the boundary between legitimate protest and unlawful infringement on the rights of others should be drawn; whether free speech includes an affirmative right to be informed, or an affirmative right to be let alone; appropriate regulations for social media; and campus speech codes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Thesis Colloquium
AS.190.498 (01)

Open to and required for Political Science majors writing a thesis. International Studies majors writing a senior thesis under the supervision of a Political Science Department faculty member may also enroll. Topics include: research design, literature review, evidence collection and approaches to analysis of evidence, and the writing process. The course lays the groundwork for completing the thesis in the second semester under the direction of the faculty thesis supervisor. Students are expected to have decided on a research topic and arranged for a faculty thesis supervisor prior to the start of the semester. Seniors. Under special circumstances, juniors will be allowed to enroll. Enrollment limit: 15.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 9:30AM - 12:00PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee E
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Citizenship and Society in the United States
AS.001.151 (01)

Popular sovereignty — the idea that the people rule themselves — has been heralded as one of the preeminent innovations of the modern world. And over the course of the last two hundred or so years, a rising tide of nations committed themselves to the principles of popular sovereignty. Yet in recent years, the inevitability, soundness, and very viability of "rule by the people" has come into question. On the one hand, popular uprisings around the globe have rejected the decisions and practices of governing elites on the grounds that they are out of touch with the people’s needs. On the other hand, these uprisings have resurrected and strengthened authoritarian practices and have facilitated the erosion of liberal rights long considered instrumental to preserving democracy. The result — turmoil, unrest, and uncertainty about what the future holds — is evident from Venezuela to England, Turkey to the United States. Can popular sovereignty survive? In what form will the people rule, and at what cost? This First-Year Seminar is an investigation into the idea and practice of popular sovereignty in the contemporary United States. We will explore this topic by actively consulting theory and empirical research in the social sciences. We will supplement this with our own research on the 2022 election, media coverage of issues, popular attitudes about democracy, and popular representation in government and by interest/advocacy groups. Additionally, this class is organized as a collaboration between two first-year seminars: one at Johns Hopkins, the other at Williams College. Over the course of the semester, the two seminars will meet frequently via videoconference to share research and discuss readings and ideas. This is intended to broaden the perspectives brought to bear on our investigation generally and, specifically, to allow each group to share real time research on the politics of the region in which their respective institutions are located.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: The Power of Speech: Law, Politics, and the Humanities
AS.001.137 (01)

What don’t we do with words? Even silence makes manifest the power of speech. This First-Year Seminar will introduce you to some of the ways that power has been described and thought about. In addition to studying arguments that connect the power of speech to what it means to be human, we will explore various attempts both to protect and limit speech, taking into consideration not only how we do things with words but how words affect us. Topics that will be covered include freedom of speech, censorship, hate speech, silence, and storytelling. We will read texts in philosophy, politics, law, and literature, and we will watch at least one film.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.168 (01)FYS: The Psychology of Mass Politics in the U.S.W 3:00PM - 5:30PMMason, Lily HallMergenthaler 266
 
AS.001.177 (01)FYS: The Right to the City - Race, Class, and Struggle in BaltimoreMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSpence, LesterGilman 134
 
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Gilman 377
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (02)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Gilman 186
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Krieger 306
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (04)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Gilman 377
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Krieger 306
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Hodson 313
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.111 (01)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Krieger 308
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (02)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Bloomberg 276
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (03)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Gilman 119
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (04)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Gilman 219
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (01)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 300
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (02)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 308
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (03)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 300
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (04)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 304
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (05)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 304
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (06)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 306
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.228 (01)The American PresidencyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminShriver Hall 104
 
POLI-AP
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 132
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.328 (01)Political Thought in the AmericasMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSimon, Josh DavidKrieger 300
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.333 (01)American Constitutional LawW 4:30PM - 7:00PMStaffGilman 55
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.350 (01)Political ViolenceT 3:00PM - 5:30PMDavid, Steven RMaryland 114
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.366 (01)Free Speech and the Law in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, Richard StephenGilman 186
 
INST-AP, INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.451 (01)GeopoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 17
 
INST-IR, INST-PT, POLI-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.454 (01)Nuclear Weapons and World PoliticsW 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 17
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.471 (01)The University and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert HShaffer 2
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.473 (01)Political PolarizationTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMTeles, Steven MichaelHodson 213
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.474 (01)Philosophy of LawTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMCulbert, JenniferGilman 219
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)T 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 302
 
INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.342 (01)The Politics of Migration ControlTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMAxster, Sabrina DianaGilman 75
 
POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 309
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.346 (01)Queer MarxismTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMVinketa, DarkoGilman 377
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.352 (01)Race, Class, and AmericaTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMann, Thomas JosephKrieger 308
 
POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT
AS.191.358 (01)Use of Force and the American StateTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButron, JulianaKrieger 306
 
POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.192.150 (01)States, Regimes & Contentious PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLawrence, Adria KShaffer 303
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora Maria DoraKrieger 300
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaShriver Hall 001
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaShriver Hall 001
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.310.305 (01)China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National SecurityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, marvin CMergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.318 (01)Eurasia's Transformation and the Global ImplicationsT 4:30PM - 7:00PMCalder, KentKrieger 300
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.326 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHe, GaochaoGilman 119
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.190.476 (01)Frantz Fanon's Global Politics: Racism, Madness, and ColonialismF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKripp, Jacob SKrieger Laverty
 
POLI-PT, POLI-IR
AS.001.150 (01)FYS: Master of the SenateT 10:30AM - 1:00PMSchlozman, DanielGilman 413
 
AS.191.334 (01)American Leviathan: Conservative State-Building in the United StatesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaff 
 
AS.001.135 (01)FYS: Free Speech and Its LimitsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKatz, Richard StephenMergenthaler 266
 
AS.190.498 (01)Thesis ColloquiumW 9:30AM - 12:00PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee E 
 
AS.001.151 (01)FYS: Citizenship and Society in the United StatesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanMergenthaler 266
 
AS.001.137 (01)FYS: The Power of Speech: Law, Politics, and the HumanitiesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMCulbert, JenniferGilman 134