Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Applied Public Health Ethics and Decision-Making
AS.150.312 (01)

In this course, students receive an introduction to core theoretical foundations and case studies in public and global health ethics. this course adopts an applied framework for understanding how public health ethical values are navigated in different decision-making processes. This course is geared toward juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS

What you need to know about Chinese Politics, Part 2
AS.190.269 (01)

This serves as a two-semester survey of Chinese politics from 1911-Present. This second module explores the politics of the reform and post-reform eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C (Andrew), Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 40/40
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Politics of the Korean Diaspora
AS.190.337 (01)

This seminar explores some of the core questions in the study of citizenship, migration, and racial and ethnic politics through the lens of Korean diasporic populations in the United States, Japan, China, and the former Soviet Union. We will examine how immigration, citizenship, and minority policies have structured and constrained the relationship of Korean communities to both the receiving and sending states. As a diasporic group, is there a collective self-identification among members of Korean communities that transcends territorial, hemispheric, linguistic, and cultural differences? Or is the Korean ethnic identity more a reflection of racial and ethnic politics in the receiving society? What factors determine the assimilability of a particular group at a given historical moment?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

American Racial Politics
AS.190.339 (01)

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Black Politics II
AS.190.342 (01)

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.340.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st Century
AS.190.347 (01)

“Can the United States and China avoid a new Cold War? One might think not given disputes over the South China Sea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, human rights, trade, ideology and so much more. Moreover, competition for influence in the developing world and American concerns as to whether China will replace it as the preeminent world power suggest a new Cold War is in the offing. Nevertheless, their extensive economic ties and need to work together to solve common problems such as climate change, nuclear proliferation, and pandemics argues against a continuing confrontation. This course will examine whether cooperation or conflict will define Sino-American relations, and whether a new Cold War—or even a shooting war—lies in the future.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Africana Studies Meets Public Health
AS.190.383 (01)

This course brings scholars from Africana studies into conversation with scholars from Public Health to discuss the colonial lineages and racialized effects of projects seeking to improve the health of populations. Students will spend each week listening to a themed, live conversation between Africana and Public Health scholars. They will then unpack the conversation, in relation to course readings, in weekly seminars. The aim of the course is to better understand the racialized and (post)colonial determinants of public health scholarship and policy from the local (Baltimore) to the global.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert (Robbie)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives. It is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while cultivating a broad grasp of the challenges of “East Asia's fast-paced economic growth.” Part I considers the origins of East Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the 1997-1998 East Asian financial crisis, its lessons and the economic renaissance that followed. Part II focuses on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to East Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, trade integration, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Eurasia's Transformation and the Global Implications
AS.310.318 (01)

Eurasia, stretching from the Western Europe across Russia, Central Asia, and China to the Pacific, is by far the largest continent on earth, with a massive share of global population, economic output, and key natural resources. It has been traditionally Balkanized. Yet since the late 1970s, due to China’s modernizations, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and a series of global geo-economic shocks, the nations of this Super Continent have become increasingly interactive, creating fluid new trans-regional political-economic patterns that remain remarkably unexplored. This course explores the critical junctures that made Eurasia the dynamic, growing colossus that it is becoming today, as well as the global implications, from a unique problem-oriented perspective. It looks first at the developmental and political challenges confronting China, Russia, and key European states as the Cold War waned, how the key nations coped, and how they might have evolved differently. It then considers the new challenges of the post-Cold War world, and how national and local leaders are responding today. Particular attention is given, in this problem—centric approach, to the challenges that growing Eurasian continental connectivity, epitomized in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, are creating for US foreign policy and for the grand strategy of American allies in NATO, Japan, and Korea. Note: Some familiarity with Eurasian history and/or politics is recommended

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Kent
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (02)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (04)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (06)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (01)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (03)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (05)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (07)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (08)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (02)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (01)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (03)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Future of American Democracy
AS.190.322 (01)

For the most part, observers of American politics have not considered the possibility that the American democratic regime might be at risk. But the unexpected election of Donald Trump in 2016 and the subsequent course of his presidency have occasioned a great deal of uncertainty and anxiety about whether democracy in the United States is at risk and whether American political institutions can withstand the stresses of contemporary politics. This course will use the Trump era to explore the conditions that seem to threaten the stability of the American regime. We will begin by exploring the political circumstances that led to Trump’s rise. We will then examine what we can learn from the experience of other countries about the conditions that make democracy either robust or fragile. Finally, we will consider how a set of contemporary political conditions in the United States — extreme partisan polarization, intense racial antagonism, growing economic inequality, and expanded executive power — contribute to the challenges facing American democracy today and in the future.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (01)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Human Security
AS.190.283 (01)

While traditional studies on security have focused largely on border protection, sovereign authority of the state, and interstate alliances, the threats posed to everyday people were not a central focus of security analyses until the end of the Cold War. The human security approach has evolved as a challenge to conventional thinking on security. This course will introduce the notion of human security, trace its emergence and evolution in the global political discourse, explore the theoretical scholarship from which it developed, and evaluate its effectiveness as a framework for addressing the most egregious threats human beings face today. From refugee flows, gender inequality, ethnic conflict, mass atrocities, poverty, to climate change, human security scholarship and policy has sought to examine the various threats to the lives of people that transcend national borders and allow us to break out of narrow thinking to develop innovative and globally-minded solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Barqueiro, Carla Robertson (Carla)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (04)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Democracy And Elections
AS.190.326 (01)

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Imagining Borders
AS.190.335 (01)

What is a border and why do borders matter in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings which come from political science and other disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 35/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Seminar In Anti-Semitism
AS.190.344 (01)

Jews exercise a good deal of power in contemporary America.. They are prominent in a number of key industries, play important roles in the political process, and hold many major national offices. For example, though Jews constitute barely two percent of America’s citizens, about one-third of the nation’s wealthiest 400 individuals are Jewish and more than ten percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress are held by Jews. One recent book declared that, “From the Vatican to the Kremlin, from the White House to Capitol Hill, the world’s movers and shakers view American Jewry as a force to be reckoned with.” Of course, Jews have risen to power in many times and places ranging from the medieval Muslim world and early modern Spain through Germany and the Soviet Union in the 20th century. In nearly every prior instance, though, Jewish power proved to be evanescent. No sooner had the Jews become “a force to be reckoned with” than they found themselves banished to the political ma rgins, forced into exile or worse. Though it may rise to a great height, the power of the Jews seems ultimately to rest on a rather insecure foundation. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Constitutional Law
AS.190.334 (01)

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily (Emily)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Politics of Information
AS.190.327 (01)

Considers global and comparative politics of information, information technologies, and the Internet. Examines governance of information (ownership of information, rights to information, privacy) and governance of information technologies (domain names, social media websites, etc.).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Political Violence
AS.190.374 (01)

This undergraduate seminar is designed to introduce students to the comparative study of political violence and intra-state conflict. We will examine social science theories and empirical studies on a wide range of forms of political violence, including civil war, coups, state repression, communal violence, riots, terrorism, genocide, and criminal-political violence. We will study these phenomena at the micro, meso and macro levels, and focus on understanding their causes, dynamics, outcomes, and aftermath. The class will also equip students with an ability to analyze political violence by using social scientific tools.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Amat Matus, Consuelo
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR

Race and American Democracy
AS.190.390 (01)

While the United States has long been a democracy for white men, it has mostly been anything but democratic when seen through the eyes of Black Americans. But progress toward the expansion of democracy has occurred at a few times in American history. What made American democratization possible, and how might the United States again move toward more complete and inclusive democracy?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

Nationalism and the Politics of Identity
AS.190.379 (01)

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (01)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 40/40
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (02)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

The Political Bases of the Market Economy
AS.190.429 (01)

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
AS.190.394 (01)

This course examines the domestic, regional, and transnational politics of the Middle East and North Africa. The class is organized into three units. The first examines major armed conflicts— anti-colonial, intra-state, and inter-state—from 1948 through the 1990s. It uses these historical moments as windows onto key issues in Middle Eastern and North African political issues such as external intervention/occupation, human rights, sectarianism, social movements, and memory politics. Unit Two focuses on policy relevant issues such as democratization, minority populations, religion and politics, and gender. In Unit Three, students will explore the politics of the Arab Uprisings through critical reading and discussion of new (post-2011) scholarship on MENA states, organizations, and populations. Enrollment limited to Political Science and International Studies majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

European Politics in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.440 (01)

Europe has been in a sense the first testing ground for theories of comparative politics, but many outsiders now see Europe as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question conventional wisdom through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. We will apply the comparative method to the study of European politics today, and conversely we will ask what Europe tells us more generally about politics. We will see that Europe is still a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy and fundamental rights, the welfare state, class stratification, immigration and race, the role of religion; European integration and globalization. Recommended background: Introduction to Comparative Politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (04)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily (Emily)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Politics Of Good & Evil
AS.190.398 (01)

The Politics of Good and Evil examines comparatively a series of classical myths and modern philosophies concerning the sources of evil, the nature of goodness and nobility, the relations of culture to politics, nature and the gods, the degree to which any metaphysic or theological faith is certain, and so on. It is a course in “elemental theory” in the sense that each text pursued challenges and disrupts others we read. Often the reader is disrupted existentially too, in ways that may spur new thought. A previous course in political theory or a theoretical course in the humanities is advised. A high tolerance for theory is essential. Texts on or by Sophocles, Job, Genesis ("J" version), Augustine, Voltaire, Nietzsche, James Baldwin, W. Connolly and Elizabeth Kolbert form the core of the class. Assignments: 1) One 12 page paper and a second 5-7 page paper, both anchored in the readings; 2) a class presentation on one text; 3) regular attendance and quality participation in class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (01)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III. (PJ)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Death Penalty
AS.190.472 (01)

Political power has been defined as “a right of making laws with penalty of death, and consequently all less penalties…and of employing the force of the community in the execution of such laws….only for the public good” (John Locke). This course will explore political power as it is identified with this right. To this end, we will consider a broad range of topics, among them how death is understood (or not) when it is identified as the most severe punishment that can be imposed by a state. We will also consider how the state (particularly the United States) exercises the right to make laws with the penalty of death, as well as how the state executes these laws. In addition, we will consider how the penalty of death is imposed by the state without specific legislation. Readings for the course will include, among others, texts by Camus, Girard, Foucault, Sarat, Berlant, Butler, and Schmitt, as well as U.S. Supreme Court cases and a novel. Students will be required to participate in class discussion and draft and write two papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, INST-AP

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (06)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert (Robbie)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Violence and Politics
AS.190.438 (01)

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (02)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Theories and Histories of Property
AS.191.330 (01)

This course will unpack a concept and phenomenon that is as politically significant as it is often taken for granted. What is property? How did it develop? Are there different forms of property? Are there alternatives to property? Is property a universal human right? Through lectures, student-led seminars, films, and a diverse array of texts, we will explore the theoretical sides of property (how the concept has been imagined, acknowledged, and/or critiqued by political and social theorists) as well as its political realities: What forms of property have historically existed? Which have become dominant, and why? What is property’s relationship to policing, gender and family politics, slavery, colonialism, race, capitalism, democracy, and the modern state? And how is property challenged or resisted?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Schwebach, Elliott Michael
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (03)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.190.499 (05)

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III. (PJ)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Racial Capitalism in a Global Perspective
AS.191.331 (01)

We live in a world of brutal racial violence and massive economic inequality. How did the world get this way? Can these global conditions be changed? This course tackles these questions through the lens of global racial capitalism. We will draw the global political theories of Karl Marx, W.E.B. Du Bois, C.L.R James, Cedric Robinson, Angela Davis and Saidiya Hartman to think about how people are brought into violent contact through imperialism, colonialism, warfare, trade, and cultural exchange. Topics include: slavery, logistics, global policing, war, class, profit, primitive accumulation, decolonization, resistance, and freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kripp, Jacob S
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, INST-ECON

Kissinger Seminar on American Grand Strategy
AS.192.410 (01)

Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructor and space in the course is limited. To apply, email a one-page resume, one-page personal statement on why you want to take the class including how it contributes to your professional interests, and a writing sample of less than ten pages to KissingerCenter@jhu.edu by the end of the day on Sunday, October 24, 2021. This course is an initiative of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. It will expose exceptional undergraduate students to the study of grand strategy and the history of U.S. foreign policy. The course will explore critical moments, themes, and people in the history of American grand strategy, from Washington’s Farewell Address to the statecraft of Donald Trump. The seminar will also consider key issues in U.S. grand strategy today, from climate change to the challenge of an assertive China. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with current and former policymakers who have worked on these issues in real time. The course will meet 9 times at Homewood and 4 times at the SAIS campus in Washington, D.C.; transportation between Homewood campus and SAIS will be provided.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brands, Henry S (Hal)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

The State of Nature
AS.190.357 (01)

Though it is possible to imagine ways of addressing the multiple crises the world will face as the atmosphere warms, seas rise, and pollutants seep into the surface of the planet, any serious proposal will require a degree of coordination amongst nation-states that has proven impossible to achieve in the past. In this course, we will consider this difficult situation by treating it as an instance of an old problem in political theory: how to escape the infamous “state of nature,” where individuals struggle to obtain the resources they need to survive at others’ expense, rather than cooperating to satisfy their needs and address the threats they face in common. First, we will study some influential reflections on the state of nature by Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Freud, and Pateman, as well as efforts to apply the logic of the state of nature to problems in international politics by Kant, Wendt, Waltz, Enloe, and others. Then we will read contemporary work on the international politics of climate change and ask what it would take to start building the better world that is possible today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Simon, Joshua David (Josh)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, POLI-CP, INST-PT

Niccolò Machiavelli's "The Prince": Understanding the Meaning and Legacy of a Masterpiece
AS.211.300 (01)

Who was Niccolò Machiavelli? We often hear the term “Machiavellian” in reference to actors in business or politics, but what does it really mean? What does Machiavelli teach us about the nature and the dynamics of political power? Can Machiavelli’s thought offer insights into today’s politics and fast-changing world? The course aims to answer these questions by addressing three topics. First, we will study Machiavelli’s life and times, particularly the events connected to his production and the context in which he wrote his main writings. We will see how the fifteenth-century Florentine humanism and the massive political changes affecting early modern Europe shaped Machiavelli’s mindset. Second, we will familiarize ourselves with Machiavelli’s thought by reading The Prince and excerpts from Discourses on Livy. Third, we will get acquainted with some of the main trends in the reception of Machiavelli in the 20th and 21st centuries. Special attention will be paid to interpretations of Machiavelli by Antonio Gramsci, Leo Strauss, Isaiah Berlin, John Greville Agard Pocock, Quentin Skinner, and John P. McCormick. We will also pay attention to modern television programs and films that show the width and depth of Machiavelli's legacy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Panichi, Alessio
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ITAL, INST-PT

The Political Economy of Modern India
AS.230.318 (01)

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina (Rina)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.150.312 (01)Applied Public Health Ethics and Decision-MakingM 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaff 
 
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.190.269 (01)What you need to know about Chinese Politics, Part 2T 1:30PM - 4:00PMMertha, Andrew C (Andrew), Yasuda, John Kojiro 
 
POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.337 (01)Politics of the Korean DiasporaT 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, Erin 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.339 (01)American Racial PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester 
 
INST-AP
AS.190.342 (01)Black Politics IIT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester 
 
INST-AP
AS.190.347 (01)A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st CenturyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven R 
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.383 (01)Africana Studies Meets Public HealthTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMShilliam, Robert (Robbie) 
 
POLI-IR
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora) 
 
INST-ECON
AS.310.318 (01)Eurasia's Transformation and the Global ImplicationsT 4:30PM - 7:00PMCalder, Kent 
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.102 (02)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.102 (04)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.102 (06)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.102 (01)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.102 (03)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.102 (05)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.102 (07)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.102 (08)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBennett, Jane 
 
INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBennett, Jane 
 
INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.220 (02)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel) 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.220 (01)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel) 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.220 (03)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel) 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.322 (01)Future of American DemocracyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLieberman, Robert C 
 
INST-AP
AS.190.308 (01)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMazzuca, Sebastian L 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.283 (01)Human SecurityTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBarqueiro, Carla Robertson (Carla) 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.220 (04)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel) 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.326 (01)Democracy And ElectionsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, Richard Stephen 
 
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.335 (01)Imagining BordersTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.344 (01)Seminar In Anti-SemitismW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin 
 
INST-AP
AS.190.334 (01)Constitutional LawTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMZackin, Emily (Emily) 
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.327 (01)Politics of InformationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.374 (01)Political ViolenceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAmat Matus, Consuelo 
 
POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.390 (01)Race and American DemocracyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLieberman, Robert C 
 
POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.190.379 (01)Nationalism and the Politics of IdentityF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew A 
 
INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.190.392 (01)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMMazzuca, Sebastian L 
 
POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.392 (02)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian L 
 
POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.429 (01)The Political Bases of the Market EconomyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-ECON
AS.190.394 (01)Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North AfricaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMParkinson, Sarah 
 
INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.190.440 (01)European Politics in Comparative PerspectiveW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas) 
 
INST-CP
AS.190.499 (04)Senior ThesisZackin, Emily (Emily) 
 
AS.190.398 (01)Politics Of Good & EvilM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William E 
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.499 (01)Senior ThesisBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. (PJ) 
 
AS.190.472 (01)The Death PenaltyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, Jennifer 
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT, INST-AP
AS.190.499 (06)Senior ThesisShilliam, Robert (Robbie) 
 
AS.190.438 (01)Violence and PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.499 (02)Senior ThesisDavid, Steven R 
 
AS.191.330 (01)Theories and Histories of PropertyTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMSchwebach, Elliott Michael 
 
POLI-PT
AS.190.499 (03)Senior ThesisMarlin-Bennett, Renee 
 
AS.190.499 (05)Senior ThesisBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. (PJ) 
 
AS.191.331 (01)Racial Capitalism in a Global PerspectiveTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKripp, Jacob S 
 
POLI-IR, POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, INST-ECON
AS.192.410 (01)Kissinger Seminar on American Grand StrategyM 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrands, Henry S (Hal) 
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:20PMPomeranzev, Peter 
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.190.357 (01)The State of NatureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSimon, Joshua David (Josh) 
 
POLI-PT, POLI-CP, INST-PT
AS.211.300 (01)Niccolò Machiavelli's "The Prince": Understanding the Meaning and Legacy of a MasterpieceMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMPanichi, Alessio 
 
MLL-ITAL, INST-PT
AS.230.318 (01)The Political Economy of Modern IndiaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, Rina (Rina) 
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL