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American Government: Power and Purpose

Based on the Full Edition of American Government: Power and Purpose but with a simpler framework, the Brief 13th Edition includes new content on how race, gender, and group identity intersect with political behavior and institutions. Additionally, leading scholars have contributed new “Analyzing the Evidence” features that engage students with the questions and methods that […]


Food and the City

Professor Adam Sheingate’s Baltimore Food System Research class is featured in Arts & Sciences Magazine. The summer course began as an outgrowth of Sheingate’s tremendously popular Food Politics class (70–75 students are often on the waiting list for one of 15 coveted seats). Click to read the article.


The Value of Violence

Though violence is commonly deplored, political scientist Ginsberg argues that in many ways it is indispensable, unavoidable, and valuable. Ginsberg sees violence manifested in society in many ways. “Law-preserving violence” (using Walter Benjamin’s phrase) is the chief means by which society preserves social order. Behind the security of a stable society are the blunt instruments […]


The Fragility of Things: Self-Organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism

In The Fragility of Things, eminent theorist William E. Connolly focuses on several self-organizing ecologies that help to constitute our world. These interacting geological, biological, and climate systems, some of which harbor creative capacities, are depreciated by that brand of neoliberalism that confines self-organization to economic markets and equates the latter with impersonal rationality. Neoliberal practice […]


Fall of the Faculty: The Rise of the All-Administrative University and Why it Matters

Until very recently, American universities were led mainly by their faculties, which viewed intellectual production and pedagogy as the core missions of higher education. Today, as Benjamin Ginsberg warns in this eye-opening, controversial book, “deanlets”–administrators and staffers often without serious academic backgrounds or experience–are setting the educational agenda. The Fall of the Faculty examines the fallout […]


Joel Grossman Named Academy Professor

Three faculty members from the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences have been named professors of The Academy at Johns Hopkins, including political science Professor Joel Grossman. The Academy at Johns Hopkins is an institute for advanced study, where retired professors can pursue research opportunities, conduct and attend academic seminars, and explore other opportunities for continued scholarship.


Looking for Rights in All the Wrong Places: Why State Constitutions Contain America’s Positive Rights

Unlike many national constitutions, which contain explicit positive rights to such things as education, a living wage, and a healthful environment, the U.S. Bill of Rights appears to contain only a long list of prohibitions on government. American constitutional rights, we are often told, protect people only from an overbearing government, but give no explicit […]


How the Jews Defeated Hitler: Exploding the Myth of Jewish Passivity in the Face of Nazism

One of the most common assumptions about World War II is that the Jews did not actively or effectively resist their own extermination at the hands of the Nazis. In this powerful book, Benjamin Ginsberg convincingly argues that the Jews not only resisted the Germans but actually played a major role in the defeat of […]


Coming to Grips With ‘Kludgeocracy’

Steven Teles

In an interview with Ezra Klein of the Washington Post, Prof. Steven Teles argues that issues concerning the complexity of government, rather than its size, will dominate American politics going forward. The nation has become a “kludgeocracy,” he says, with too many government programs and policies—”kludges”—that are substantially more complicated than the problems they are […]


Market Irrationality

William Connolly’s new book, The Fragility of Things, is featured in Johns Hopkins Magazine.