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Political Science Professors to Be Featured on CSPAN2’s ‘Book TV’

Nine Johns Hopkins University faculty authors will be featured on C-SPAN2‘s Book TV over the next several weekends, beginning with Lester Spence, an expert on race and politics, who will discuss his 2011 book Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics on Sunday at 1 p.m. EST and 10 p.m. PST. […]


Arresting Citizenship: The Democratic Consequences of American Crime Control

Winner of the Dennis Judd Best Book in Urban Politics Award Never before has American government exhibited so strong an urge to punish, and so vast a network of institutions dedicated to the control, confinement and supervision of its citizens. Citizen contact with criminal justice is unmatched in American history and around the world. How […]


Political Science Major Featured in Arts & Sciences Magazine

Carrie Resnick

Political science major Carrie Resnick is studying the campaigns of female gubernatorial candidates in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Texas, and Wisconsin, focusing on the specific challenges these candidates for executive offices face and how women’s issues play in their campaigns.


Bearing Society in Mind: Theories and Politics of the Social Formation

Political and economic models of society often operate at a level of abstraction so high that the connections between them, and their links to culture, are beyond reach. Bearing Society in Mindchallenges these disciplinary boundaries and proposes an alternative framework—the social formation. The theory of social formation demonstrates how the fabric of society is made […]


The Worth of War

Although war is terrible and brutal, history shows that it has been a great driver of human progress. So argues political scientist Benjamin Ginsberg in this incisive, well-researched study of the benefits to civilization derived from armed conflict. Ginsberg makes a convincing case that war selects for and promotes certain features of societies that are […]


The Power of Memory in Democratic Politics

George Orwell famously argued that those who control the past control the future, and those who control the present control the past. In this study of the relationship between democracy and memory, P. J. Brendese examines Orwell’s insight, revealing how political power affects what is available to be remembered, who is allowed to recall the […]


The Lessons of Rancière

“Liberal democracy” is the name given to a regime that much of the world lives in or aspires to, and both liberal and deliberative theorists focus much of their intellectual energy on working to reshape and perfect this regime. But what if “liberal democracy” were a contradiction in terms? Taking up Jacques Rancière’s polemical claim […]


Political Science Major’s Research Featured in Arts & Sciences Magazine

Political science major Talene Bilazarian’s research evaluates the effectiveness of a counter-extremism initiative in the U.K. that engages with Muslim women to serve as partners in identifying radicalism. Click to read about it in Arts & Sciences Magazine.


Learning From History

Steven Teles

Prof. Steven Teles’ class, Policy Errors, Mistakes and Disasters: Learning from Failure, is featured in Arts & Sciences Magazine.


Political Science Major Named Fulbright Scholar

Bayly Winder, a senior majoring in political science, received a Fulbright grant to Kuwait to study the diwaniyya, intellectual forums. Through visits to a variety of diwaniyyas and interviews with mostly college-aged Kuwaitis, he will research the ways in which this central sociocultural institution is evolving in light of social media and globalization. Winder, who […]